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Screening Strategies

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Value Momentum Screen

This is a combined value/momentum screen loosely based on the AAII "Value on the Move" screen and Jack Hough's "Impatient Value" screen in "Your Next Great Stock". It tries to uncover stocks that are bargain priced but avoid "value trap" stocks, which may languish for years until the market recognizes their “true” worth. Value and momentum investing styles might seem to have little in common but, in fact, research also indicates that momentum can be a catalyst to value.  The screen looks for two attributes: A share price within 10% cent of its 52-week high (the momentum part of the equation), and a PEG ratio – price-earnings to growth – of less than 1.5 (the value part). The PEG ratio is simply the forward price-to-earnings multiple divided by the projected growth rate in earnings.   more »

Momentum Investing
Annualised Return: 27.6%
Bold Earnings Revisions Screen

This screen seeks to identify stocks that have experienced recent revisions in the earnings estimates. Specifically, it looks for stocks that have seen one analyst revision in the last week/month, to try to see if there is an analyst moving away from the consensus. This follows research that showed "bold" estimates like this have a significant impact on share price performance. Note: that this screen on its own isn't able to only pull back revisions that are "bold" (moving away from the consensus), as opposed to revisions that are "herding" (moving closer to the consensus). This will need to be done by analysing the actual list of companies produced in more detail. more »

Momentum Investing
Annualised Return: 27.4%
Josef Lakonishok Screen

A value and momentum screen focused on finding under-valued, out-of-favor companies just at the point when the market is starting to recognise them. According to Lakonishok, investors have judgmental biases and behavioral weaknesses including the tendency to extrapolate the past too far into the future, to wrongly equate a good company with a good investment irrespective of price, to ignore statistical evidence and to develop a "mindset" about a company. As a result, "value stocks become underpriced and glamour stocks become overpriced relative to their fundamentals".  This screen looks for: At least one of Price-to-book, price-to-cash-flow, price-earnings or price-to-sales ratios more favourable than the industry  6 Month relative strength above zero  3 month relative strength above zero EPS Surprise or a trending revision in the analyst consensus more »

Momentum Investing
Annualised Return: 26.8%
Martin Zweig Growth Screen

A Growth at a Reasonable price (GARP) investing strategy that uses both fundamental analysis and market timing. It focuses on strong growth in earnings and sales, a reasonable price-earnings ratio given the company's growth rate, insider support, and relatively strong price action. Martin E. Zweig was a reputed US growth money manager back in the 1990’s as well as an investment newsletter writer. He was named stock picker of the year 2 times in a row and wrote a book titled “Winning on Wall Street”, which outlines his investing strategy. Zweig is essentially a growth investor but with a conservative streak, focusing on selecting growth stocks with certain value characteristics, through a system that uses both fundamental analysis and market timing. more »

Growth Investing
Annualised Return: 26.3%
Neglected Firms Screen

This screen involves seeking out stocks that are covered by few, if any, financial analysts and attempting to discover sources of value that may have been overlooked by other investors. Neglected firms tend to be small, low-profile companies that have not received much media attention. Areas of the market that attract media attention, public interest or sophisticated institutional followings are more likely to be properly priced than areas that are off the beaten track. more »

Value Investing
Annualised Return: 26.1%
Charles Kirkpatrick Growth Screen

Kirkpatrick’s Growth Screen combines quantitative filters for relative price strength and relative reported earnings growth, and then involves point & figure chart analysis to determine whether the stock is in an upward trend. Kirkpatrick also looks for growth companies with market capitalizations of at least $1 billion and share prices of at least $10. Kirkpatrick uses point & figure charts to help in the buy and sell decision process. He only buys stocks for his Growth Model when they are in an upward trend, as indicated by two higher highs in a three-point reversal point & figure chart. You can read more here. more »

Growth Investing
Annualised Return: 25.9%
Warren Buffett - Hagstrom Screen

Warren Buffett is the greatest living investor whose investing style was best modelled in the books by Robert Hagstrom.  Buffett's approach is a highly fundamentals-focused one blending both Graham-esque value investing principles and an emphasis on the calibre of the business franchise. In essence, it looks for simple, understandable companies that have a monopoly position and pricing power (for example, through strong brand recognition), so as to ensure consistent profits and a good return on equity, but where there is significant unrecognized value.   Our quantitative model here cannot aim to replicate the qualitative work and understanding that Buffett brings to stock selection, but aims to highlight the kinds of companies showing the longer term fundamental strength and cashflow generation that attracts him. more »

Quality Investing
Annualised Return: 25.7%
Piotroski F-Score Price to Earnings Value Screen

The Piotroski F-Score screen aims to identify deep bargain-bucket stocks that are in recovery.  Josef Piotroski, a finance professor, recognized that, while it has long been shown that bargain stocks have strong collective returns, there is very wide individual variability. What he wondered was whether it was possible to weed out the poor performers and identify the winners in advance. He therefore sought to develop a simple accounting-based scoring system for evaluating a stock’s financial strength. Piotroski's F-Score looks at value stocks and tests nine variables from a company’s financial statements. One point is awarded for each test that a stock passes. Piotroski regards any stocks that scored eight or nine points as being the strongest. In this version of the screen, Price to Earnings, rather than Price to Book, is used as the measure of "cheapness".  more »

Value Investing
Annualised Return: 24.9%
Muhlenkamp's ROE Screen

This screen essentially looks for high ROEs at a reasonable price. Ronald Muhlenkamp is a renowned US investor and founder and president of the Muhlenkamp mutual fund. The Muhlenkamp fund averaged a 10.4% annual rate of return over the last 10 years to 2004 while the S&P 500 has returned 8.5%. His approach involves searching for companies with ROEs above the historic average for all companies (c. 14% for US companies since WW2) . In additions, ROEs should have remained stable over the last five years and the Company should be well-priced according to the PE Ratio. The strategy looks for companies with higher earnings growth than that of their industry peers. One should also look at profit and cost control via a factor such as the operating or net profit margin of the firm relative to its industry. The strategy also looks at financial stability, both through liabilities as a ratio to assets and the amount of free cash of the firm. You can read more about Muhlenkamp's investment philosophy here. and here more »

Quality Investing
Annualised Return: 24.7%
Dividend Dogs (Forecast) of the FTSE

A dividend screen mirroring the famous "Dogs of the Dow" approach which selects the ten FTSE-100 stocks whose dividend is the highest fraction of their price. This version uses the consensus forecast dividend yield, rather than the historic yield.  more »

Income Investing
Annualised Return: 23.4%
Price Momentum Screen

A momentum screen based on buying prior winning stocks and selling short prior losers based on the empirical observation that Investments exhibit persistence in their relative performance. Buying winners inherently conflicts with the contrarian philosophy that is part and parcel of many successful investors. Nevertheless, it has long been noted by traders that good performing investments tend to continue to do so, whereas those that have performed relatively poorly tend to continue on the same path. This screen looks for high relative strength in the last six to twelve months compared with the market (top 25%) - relative strength doesn't work over short timeframes, such as one month. It excludes the most illiquid stocks, i.e. the bottom 25% of stocks based on market capitalisation. You can read more here.  more »

Momentum Investing
Annualised Return: 23.2%
Piotroski F-Score Price to Book Value Screen

The Piotroski F-Score screen aims to identify deep bargain-bucket stocks that are in recovery.  Josef Piotroski, a finance professor, recognized that, while it has long been shown that bargain stocks (having a low Price to Book Value) have strong collective returns, there is very wide individual variability. “Embedded in that mix of companies, you have some that are just stellar. Their performance turns around [but] half of the firms languish; they continue to perform poorly and eventually de-list or enter bankruptcy.” What he wondered was whether it was possible to weed out the poor performers and identify the winners in advance. He therefore sought to develop a simple accounting-based scoring system for evaluating a stock’s financial strength. Piotroski's F-Score looks at value stocks, i.e. the bottom 20% of the market in terms of price to book value, and tests nine variables from a company’s financial statements. One point is awarded for each test that a stock passes. Piotroski regards any stocks that scored eight or nine points as being the strongest. more »

Value Investing
Annualised Return: 22.8%
David Dreman Low PE Screen

This is a strict value strategy based on the writings of David Dreman and focusing on low P/E stocks. David Dreman champions a contrarian investment approach based on interpreting market psychology and using value measures to pick stocks that are out of favour with the market.   Dreman invests in out-of-favour stocks, often in out-of-favour industries, that he identifies using relatively straightforward metric criteria. He says: "I buy stocks when they are battered. I am strict with my discipline. I always buy stocks with low price-earnings ratios, low price-to-book value ratios and higher-than-average yield. Academic studies have shown that a strategy of buying out-of-favor stocks with low P/E, price-to-book and price-to-cash flow ratios outperforms the market pretty consistently over long periods of time." You can read more about David Dreman here. more »

Value Investing
Annualised Return: 22.0%
James O'Shaugnessy Cornerstone Growth

The Cornerstone Growth Screen is a growth screen which combines relative strength, earnings growth and a price-to-sales value measure, as outlined in the third edition of James O'Shaughnessy’s seminal 1996 book What Works on Wall Street. According to his book, O'Shaughnessy found that his growth strategy outperformed the market producing an annual compound return of 18% from 1954 to 1996, compared to 8.3% for the S&P 500 Index (this beat his Cornerstone Value strategy which achieved 15%, although it was more volatile). more »

Growth Investing
Annualised Return: 21.8%
Negative Enterprise Value Screen

Some companies trade so cheaply that their cash balance is worth more than the company's enterprise value (i.e. the sum of the market cap and total long term debts).  This is known as a negative enterprise value (EV) and searching for such companies is a common bargain stock strategy. While, in theory, a negative EV may seem to be an easy arbitrage opportunity, whereby one could buy all of the debt and equity in a firm and use its cash balance to cover costs and keep the difference, there are a number of reasons to be cautious: Firstly, the enterprise value may not have captured all of the debt outstanding in the firm (e.g. the present value of lease commitments) and secondly the cash balance is from the balance sheet (rather than stated at the today's date used for the market cap). Given how quickly firms burn through cash, what you see on the balance sheet may not reflect what the firm has as of today as a cash balance so be careful! You can read more here. more »

Bargain Stocks
Annualised Return: 21.7%
52 Week High Momentum Screen

An investing screen based on buying stocks that are close to their 52 week high (and/or selling stocks that are close to their 52 week lows). Similar to other forms of momentum investing, this seems to work because investors tend to under-react to positive (or negative) information about those kinds of stocks. Researchers surmise that investors use the 52- week high as an “anchor” against which they value stocks, thus they tend to be reluctant to buy a stock as it nears this point regardless of new positive information. As a result, investors underreact when stock prices approach the 52-week high, and consequently, contrary to most investors' expectations, stocks near their 52-week highs tend to be systematically undervalued.  Finally, when information prevails and the 52 week high is broken, the market “wakes up” and prices see excess gains.   You can read more here. more »

Momentum Investing
Annualised Return: 21.6%
Quality Income Screen

In 2012, the team at Soc Gen introduced their so called ‘SG Quality Income Index’ - an index that aims to track stocks with strong fundamentals and good yields. Many in the market now appreciate that both higher ‘quality’ stocks and higher yielding stocks tend to outperform, but according to the research note, stocks that share both qualities put together standout total returns that have averaged 11.6% per year since 1990, more than doubling the return of the global equity markets at a significantly reduced volatility. But what is more striking is the return of the portfolio from when the market topped in 2000 to 2012 - a sideways market and a genuinely miserable time for all. While the total return of stock markets has actually been negative in that time period, the Quality Income index almost tripled. Read the full article. more »

Income Investing
Annualised Return: 21.0%
Piotroski High F-Score Screen

Josef Piotroski came up with a simple nine criteria scoring system to help identify bargain stocks in recovery.  It is known as the F-Score and is used extensively throughout Stockopedia on Stock Reports and in screens as a measure of an improving financial health trend.  But while his now famous original strategy (which we have modelled here) focused on applying the F-Score filter to only the cheapest stocks in the market, other analysts have discovered that the highest F-Scoring companies in the market in aggregate also outperform.   We have filtered the market in this strategy to just highlight the companies showing a Piotroski F-Score of 9. more »

Quality Investing
Annualised Return: 20.8%
John Templeton Bargain Screen

John Templeton believed that there were no simple formulae to finding good stocks, with over 100 factors that can be considered at times. However, Templeton did have four criteria which he considered particularly important: i) P/E ratio, ii) Operating profit margins, iii) Liquidating value and iv) Consistency of growth rates. Templeton also looked for any potential catalysts (new markets and products, potential M&A, as well as industry changes). more »

Value Investing
Annualised Return: 20.3%
Dividend Achievers Screen

This is a screen for companies that have paid increasing regular cash dividends for five or more consecutive years. It is inspired by the index run by Indxis, the Index Services unit of US player, Mergent. In addition to stipulating five or more years of increasing dividends, a stock must meet specific liquidity screening criteria. Furthermore, they must be companies with strong cash reserves, a solid balance sheet and a proven record of consistent earnings growth.  You can read more here. more »

Income Investing
Annualised Return: 19.8%
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