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Screening Strategies

67 strategies sorted by
Altman Z-Score Screen

The Altman Z-Score is a checklist for identifying stocks that might be at risk of bankruptcy. It was created by US finance Professor Edward Altman and detailed in a book he co-authored, called Managing Credit Risk. The Z-Score is a red flag indicator that can be used as a short selling strategy. It analyses five weighted business ratios to estimate the likelihood of financial distress. Broadly, these checks examine a company's asset, strength, profitability, solvency, efficiency and ability to generate earnings. Altman wrote: "The detection of company operating and financial difficulties is a subject which has been particularly amenable to analysis with financial ratios." Tests over 31 years to 1999 found the Z-Score to be 80-90% accurate in predicting bankruptcy one year prior to the event. The Z-Score is one of the components used in another short selling strategy: James Montier Trinity of Risk. more »

Short Selling
3 Year Return: 22.8%
David Dreman Low PE Screen

David Dreman Low Price to Equity is a value strategy developed by the renowned US fund manager and author David Dreman in his book Contrarian Investment Strategies. It uses a basic value filter of selecting the cheapest 40% of the market by P/E ratio and filtering further for quality according to company size, financial strength and growth. Dreman favoured the P/E strategy above all others: "Our money management firm uses the low-PE method as it's core strategy, but also utilizes the other 3 contrarian strategies extensively." Dreman's studies showed that the cheapest 20% of the market by P/E outperformed the most expensive 20% by 6.7% annually. It should be cautioned that Dreman's portfolio did suffer in the 2008 financial crisis due to an overweighting of low P/E banks. Dreman though continues to evangelise the power of contrarian investing to counter behavioural biases. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 20.2%
Charles Kirkpatrick Bargain Screen

Charles Kirkpatrick Bargain is a rules based strategy inspired by US investment strategist Charles Kirkpatrick's work in his excellent Beat the Market. Kirkpatrick has established strategies for finding growth and value stocks. His bargain strategy concentrates on value and momentum factors, with a very precise requirement for the price to sales ratio. Kirkpatrick's testing of of relative price-to-sales ratio rankings found that it was most effective between the 17th and 42nd percentiles in terms of cheapness. Initial testing of the Bargain Model was promising but Kirkpatrick said that several more years of testing were needed before labeling it a success. Kirkpatrick wrote: "As a result of these studies of relative selection methods, I decided to create a new list, called the 'Bargain List' that would incorporate the best triggers found so far and would only include value and price strength." more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Year Return: 19.1%
James O'Shaugnessy's Cornerstone Value

James O'Shaughnessy Cornerstone Value is a value investing strategy presented by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. His extensive backtesting found that value investing works particularly well with large capitalisation stocks with above average sales and cashflow, high levels of share liquidity, which were then sorted for the highest dividend yield. O'Shaughnessy said: "Generally speaking, when things are going against you, as they inevitably will, you have to stick to the underlying strategy? Only by doing so will you be around for when it comes rebounding back." He found that this value strategy produced an annual compound return of 15% between 1954 and 1996, compared to 8.3% for the S&P 500 index. O'Shaughnessy has continued to conduct detailed analysis of Standard & Poor's Compustat database to identify the most effective investing strategies. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 18.2%
Muhlenkamp's ROE Screen

Ronald Muhlenkamp Return on Equity is a quality investing strategy based on an approach used by US fund manager Ronald Muhlenkamp. It combines quality and value factors by looking for companies with a high return on equity (ROE) at a reasonable price. ROE is a measure of how much profit a company earns compared to the amount of shareholder equity on its balance sheet. Muhlenkamp compares ROE with other growth measures to find stocks that are likely to be highly cash generative. He said: "You want to be sure that the companies you own can survive whatever the heck happens." Muhlenkamp's methods were analysed by Ludwig B Chincarini and Daehwan Kim in Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management. They found that the Muhlenkamp fund averaged an 18.38% annual rate of return for the 19 years to 2004, versus 12.07% for the S&P 500. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 15.5%
James O'Shaugnessy Cornerstone Growth

James O'Shaughnessy Cornerstone Growth is a growth investing strategy devised by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. It combines value, momentum and growth factors, using the price-to-sales ratio, price momentum and earnings growth as its main rules. O'Shaughnessy wrote: "Marrying good value characteristics with price momentum is an excellent way to find 'cheap stocks on the mend'." He found that this strategy produced an annual compound return of 17% between 1963 and 2009. In 2012, O'Shaugnessy updated the strategy rules by replacing price-to-sales as the key value metric with 6 composited value factors. more »

Growth Investing
3 Year Return: 14.7%
Earnings Upgrade Momentum Screen

Earnings Forecast Upgrades is a momentum strategy set out by US academics Phillip McKnight and Steven Todd in research that examined how analyst forecasts affect share prices. It focuses on finding momentum stocks by highlighting those that are receiving the highest levels of upgraded earnings forecasts from analysts. It looks at both the number of analysts that have raised their forecasts on a share over the past month, and the overall percentage earnings-per-share increase among the consensus of analysts. McKnight and Todd claimed: "Stocks with the greatest number of upwards revisions in earnings, net of downward revisions, earn significantly higher returns than otherwise similar stocks." The researchers examined a portfolio of European shares and found that the 20% with the highest net upward revisions outperformed the lowest 20% by over 16% a year. Earnings upgrades are one way of finding stocks with 'earnings momentum'; those that have received upward earnings revisions are likely to do so again in the future. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Year Return: 12.9%
52 Week High Momentum Screen

52 Week High Momentum is momentum strategy that was explored in a paper called The 52-Week High and Momentum Investing by academics Thomas George and Chuan-Yang Hwang. It capitalises on the positive momentum effect which appears to cause stocks that are at, or close to, their 52 week high prices continuing to outperform. It is believed to work because investors tend to under-react to positive news about previously successful stocks and are reluctant to bid their prices higher, even if the positive news warrants it. When the full impact of the information prevails, and the 52 week high is broken, the market "wakes up" and prices see further gains. George and Hwang wrote: "Our results indicate that the 52-week measure has predictive power whether or not individual stocks have had extreme past returns. This suggests that price level is important, and is consistent with an anchor-and-adjust bias." The original research found that, between 1963 - 2001, the average monthly gain to this strategy assuming a 6 month hold was 0.45% - "about twice as large as those associated with other momentum strategies". more »

Momentum Investing
3 Year Return: 10.0%
Warren Buffett - Hagstrom Screen

Warren Buffett - Hagstrom is a quality investing strategy inspired by modelling of Warren Buffett's investment approach in books by investment strategist Robert Hagstrom, including The Warren Buffett Way. It is a strategy that combines Buffett's focus on value and business quality. It uses price-to-free cash flow as a valuation measure and assesses quality using operating profit and return on equity. In his book, Robert Hagstrom explains: "Your goal as an investor should be simply to purchase, at a rational price, a part interest in an easily understood business whose earnings are virtually certain to be materially higher, five, ten, and twenty years from now." Remember, Buffett is famous for looking beyond financial measures when examining the quality of a business franchise. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 9.5%
Piotroski High F-Score Screen

The Piotroski F-Score Screen is a quality strategy outlined by the famed academic Professor Joseph Piotroski and investigated further in a 2011 paper titled "Identifying expectation errors in Value/Glamour stocks". The strategy hunts for the best quality shares in the market regardless of price. In this version of the screen we have selected the highest scoring stocks in the market using Piotroski's nine-point fundamental checklist called the F-Score. While the F-Score was originally used only for filtering value stocks, Piotroski discovered it was just as effective for filtering glamour stocks: "Firms experiencing the strongest improvement in fundamentals (FSCORE ?7) generate a mean size-adjusted return of 5.5 percent annually". What Piotroski essentially was saying was that the highest scoring stocks returned 5.5% more than the market - these findings have been backed up by independent research by Societe Generale. Perhaps as a result the F-Score has become extremely popular with investors and is a core component of the Stockopedia StockReports. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 8.2%
The Screen of Screens

The Screen of Screens is a blended investment approach devised by Stockopedia. It picks stocks that are appearing most frequently across all the 'Guru Screens' tracked by Stockopedia - be they quality, value, momentum, growth or income (excluding short-selling strategies). A stock must be appearing on at least four strategies before it can qualify for the Screen of Screens. Ed Page Croft, CEO of Stockopedia, says: ?One benefit of a blended approach such as the Screen of Screens is that it builds a portfolio exposed to many driving factors of stock returns at once.? By definition, this strategy tends to highlight a list of relatively defensive stocks because they exhibit good fundamentals across a wide range of investing disciplines. The strategy was highlighted in an Financial Times feature by David Stevenson titled: "Stock screens to net the ones that get away". In it he said: "You need to use a website or system that can run the screens for you, and then identify the stocks that come up most often in each of them, which is exactly what Stockopedia has done." more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 7.8%
Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain Screen

Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain is a deep value 'bargain' investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. This is a simple value approach that looks for companies with a market capitalisation that is less than their net current asset value. NCAV is the calculation of current assets minus current liabilities. Ben Graham wrote: "You are neither right nor wrong because the crowd disagrees with you. You are right because your data and reasoning are right." In a study by Henry Oppenhemier in the Financial Analysts Journal, the mean return from discounted net current asset stocks over a 13-year period was 29.4% per year versus 11.5% per year for the NYSE-AMEX Index. Ben Graham advocated buying stocks that, if they were to collapse tomorrow, should still produce a positive return because of the underlying asset backing. To reduce exposure to individual failures, he also looked for a margin of safety of about 33% and suggested diversifying between at least 30 stocks. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Year Return: 7.7%
Greenblatt's Magic Formula

The Magic Formula is a value investing strategy invented by the hedge fund manager Joel Greenblatt in the bestselling and highly recommended Little Book that Beats the Market. It focuses on finding quality value stocks using a blended ranking system (the Magic Formula rank) composed from two fundamental ratios: Return on Capital (which Greenblatt argues is the best determinant of whether a business is a good one) and Earnings Yield (his favoured measure for cheapness). He summarised his philosophy with the maxim "buying cheap stocks at bargain prices is the secret to making lots of money". In the fourth edition of his book Greenblatt claimed the top scoring portfolio of 30 stocks appreciated by 30.8% each year over the previous 17 years, though he stressed that the strategy could underperform during periods of up to two years. Having now sold hundreds of thousands of copies, the "Magic Formula" is credited for reinvigorating the practice of value investing. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 5.9%
Dreman Low Price to Cash Flow Screen

David Dreman Low Price to Cashflow is a contrarian value strategy developed by the famous US investment manager and author David Dreman in his book Contrarian Investment Strategies. It uses a basic value filter of selecting the cheapest 40% of the market by Price to Cashflow ratio and filtering further for quality according to company size, financial strength and growth. Dreman favours cash flow over earnings: "If we take two companies with similar outlooks, markets, products, and management talent, the one with the higher cashflow will usually be the more rewarding stock. In investing, as in your personal finances, cash is king." Dreman's studies showed that the cheapest 20% of the market by P/CF outperformed the most expensive 20% by 6.8% annually. Dreman cautions towards a buy and hold approach because "transaction costs are often not recognized by investors, but can be very expensive". more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 4.9%
Neglected Firms Screen

Neglected Firms is a value investing strategy inspired by Ludwig Chincarini and Daehwan Kim in their book, Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management. It uses value and quality measures to find neglected shares that are under-researched by analysts and potentially misunderstood by investors. It looks for companies with low analyst coverage, above average earnings growth and that are cheaply priced according to their price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios. Chincarini and Kim explain: "It is likely that neglected firm's stock prices do not reflect all the relevant information available and that their prices will react sluggishly to relevant news. This opens a window of time and opportunity for an astute investor to purchase undervalued, neglected stocks and reap the rewards when the market recognizes the stocks' true values." Academic research by Avner Arbel and Paul Strebel found that between 1972 and 1976 comparatively neglected S&P stocks easily outperformed those that were well researched. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 3.7%
Earnings Downgrade Momentum Screen

Earnings Forecast Downgrades is a short selling and red flag strategy identified in a research paper by academics Philipp McKnight and Steven Todd, called Analyst Forecasts and the Cross Section of European Stock Returns. It looks for stocks experiencing earnings forecast downgrades by analysts as a potential trigger of negative momentum. They found that the positive returns from an earnings upgrade portfolio were large and persistent, whereas the sell portfolio generated a near zero return because bad news was quickly 'priced-in'. While the strategy on its own may be difficult to profit from, it still highlights stocks that should perhaps be avoided, or warrant careful additional research. McKnight and Todd wrote: "We find differences in the return continuation patterns of stocks with upward versus downward revisions, namely, bad news travels quickly, but good news travels slowly." more »

Short Selling
3 Year Return: 3.3%
John Templeton Bargain Screen

John Templeton Value is a value investing strategy based on the rules used by US investor Sir John Templeton. It combines value and growth factors to identify stocks trading at cheap prices but with a positive long-term outlook. The value components include the price-to-book and price-to-earnings ratios, while the growth rules focus on strong earnings and margins, and low debt. Sir John wrote: "Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism, and die on euphoria. The time of maximum pessimism is the best time to buy, and the time of maximum optimism is the best time to sell." His Templeton Growth Fund delivered a 13.8% annualised return from 1954 to 2004, versus 11.1% by the S&P 500 over the same period. Sir John also put a great deal of importance on qualitative factors, such as quality products, cost controls, and the intelligent use of earnings by management. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 3.1%
Dividend Dogs (Forecast)

Forecast Dividend Dogs of the FTSE is a high yield income strategy inspired by the popular 'Dogs of the Dow' approach of US investor Michael O'Higgins, who wrote Beating the Dow. It simply selects the 10 highest yielding stocks in a major market index like the FTSE 100, the S&P 500 or the FTSE Eurofirst 300. This version of the strategy uses the rolling 1-year forecast yield. It's main safety net is that blue chip stocks tend to be large, mature and well financed companies with long histories of weathering economic turmoil. O'Higgins wrote: "Beating the Dow is based on simple logic that will produce exceptional returns in any rational market and until excessive popularity turns contrarianism into conventional wisdom." O'Higgins suggested rebalancing the Dividend Dogs portfolio once per year, based on the highest yields available. more »

Income Investing
3 Year Return: 2.3%
Cash Accruals Screen

Cash Accruals is a quality investing strategy inspired by research into the 'accrual anomaly' by American accounting professor Richard Sloan. In company accounts, accruals are adjustments made when revenues have been booked but cash has not yet been received. This screen uses low levels of accruals as a positive quality signal. It looks for companies with a low accrual ratio, where free cash flow is higher than net income and where earnings-per-share is growing. Professor Sloan's research found that: "...firms with relatively high levels of accruals experience negative future abnormal stock returns that are concentrated around future earnings announcements." The research found that companies with small or negative accruals vastly outperform (+10%) those with large accruals. It concluded that investors focus too heavily on earnings and not on cash generation and that the share prices of companies with high accruals are more likely to reverse in future years. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 1.6%
Martin Zweig Growth Screen

Martin Zweig Growth is a growth at a reasonable price investing strategy based on an approach explained by US investor Martin Zweig in his book, Winning on Wall Street. It combines a focus on growth characteristics, value attraction and market timing. It uses various measures of earnings and sales growth and uses the price-to-earnings ratio as a valuation tool. Zweig's strategy also looks for relatively strong price action. Zweig wrote: "I've found that investors who rely on crystal balls frequently wind up with crushed glass. I'm satisfied if I can predict a market trend, get in tune with it and stay with that trend for as long as it lasts." Zweig was a reputed US money manager back during 1990s as well as an investment newsletter writer. During the 15 years that it was monitored (1980 - 1995), his newsletter returned an average of 15.9% per year. more »

Growth Investing
3 Year Return: 1.0%
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