+ Create a Screen Read the Guide Watch the Video

Screening Strategies

67 strategies sorted by
Bill Miller Contrarian Value Screen

Bill Miller Contrarian Value is a value investing strategy based on the style of US fund manager, Bill Miller. It uses value and growth factors to find stocks that are trading below their intrinsic value but are capable of rebounding. This model of Miller's contrarian approach uses price-to-free cash flow as a valuation measure but also looks at the price-to-earning growth factor (PEG) as well as sales and free cash flow growth. Miller wrote: "We are value investors because we are persuaded of the logic of buying shares of businesses when others want to sell them, and we understand that lower prices today mean higher future rates of return, and high prices today mean lower future rates of return." Between 1991 and 2005 Miller cemented his legendary reputation by guiding the Legg Mason Value Trust to a record 15 consecutive years of beating the S&P 500. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 33.9%
Benjamin Graham Enterprising Investor Screen

Benjamin Graham Enterprising Investor is a deep value investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. The strategy focuses on value stocks and the ability to buy them with a significant margin of safety. It uses valuation ratios including price-to-earnings and price-to-book but also looks for a history of earnings growth and dividend payouts. Ben Graham once said: "The determining trait of the enterprising investor is his willingness to devote time and care to the selection of securities that are both sound and more attractive than the average." Enterprising Investor is a less strict approach than Ben Graham's defensive strategies, which often focus on large, well financed and profitable companies. Instead, it looks for unpopular companies, special situations and 'bargain' issues. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 32.8%
Richard Driehaus Screen

Richard Driehaus Momentum is a momentum investing strategy inspired by an approach used by US investor Richard Driehaus. It combines a focus on price and earnings momentum in small and mid-cap companies with strong, sustained earnings growth. Importantly, Driehaus wanted to find companies that had produced significant earnings surprises over the previous year by beating analyst forecasts. Driehaus said: "I would much rather invest in a stock that's increasing in price and take the risk that it may begin to decline than invest in a stock that's already in a decline and try to guess when it will turn around." Driehaus's fund management firm Driehaus Capital Management was reported to have delivered compound annual returns of 30% during the 12 years after it was started in 1980. Driehaus was named in Barron's "All-Century" team of the 25 most influential and powerful mutual fund managers in 2000. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Year Return: 30.2%
Dividend Achievers Screen

Dividend Achievers is an income strategy inspired by an index run by Nasdaq OMX. It looks for companies that have grown their cash dividend payouts for at least the past five consecutive years. Apart from the dividend growth streak, this strategy looks for companies with reasonable share trading liquidity, strong cash reserves, a solid balance sheet and a proven record of consistent earnings growth. In his book Beating the Street, investing legend Peter Lynch, said: "The dividend is such an important factor in the success of many stocks that you could hardly go wrong by making an entire portfolio of companies that have raised their dividends for 10 to 20 years in a row." According to M&G Investments, the total cumulative return from the S&P 500 in the 10 years to 2011, with dividends reinvested, was 32%. But the return soared to 136% by investing solely in US companies that had grown their dividends for at least 25 consecutive years. more »

Income Investing
3 Year Return: 29.7%
James O'Shaugnessy Cornerstone Growth

James O'Shaughnessy Cornerstone Growth is a growth investing strategy devised by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. It combines value, momentum and growth factors, using the price-to-sales ratio, price momentum and earnings growth as its main rules. O'Shaughnessy wrote: "Marrying good value characteristics with price momentum is an excellent way to find 'cheap stocks on the mend'." He found that this strategy produced an annual compound return of 17% between 1963 and 2009. In 2012, O'Shaugnessy updated the strategy rules by replacing price-to-sales as the key value metric with 6 composited value factors. more »

Growth Investing
3 Year Return: 28.5%
John Neff Value Screen

John Neff Value is a value investing strategy based on the rules of successful US fund manager John Neff. It combines demanding value criteria with elements of growth, quality and dividend income. Although he didn't like the term, Neff was a contrarian investor buying good companies with moderate growth and high dividends while out of favour, and selling them once they rose to fair value. One of the tools used by Neff is the Total Return Ratio, which is calculated using the price-to-earnings growth factor (PEG), but adjusted for dividend yield - PEGY. John Neff wrote: "If you buy stocks when they are out of favor and unloved, and sell them into strength when other investors recognize their merits, you'll often go home with handsome gains." During his tenure as manager of Vanguard's Windsor Fund between 1964 and 1995, Neff's average annual total return was 13.7%. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 26.9%
Free Cash Flow Cows Screen

Free Cash Flow Cows is a deep value bargain strategy inspired by the investment writer, Jae Jun at Old School Value. It looks for companies that appear to be cheaply priced compared to the amount of free cash flow they generate. In particular, they should be stable, cash rich companies where free cash flow is actually growing. Among the ratios used in this strategy is Enterprise Value to Free Cash Flow and Free Cash Flow to Long Term Debt. Jae Jun says: "When it comes to true profitability, forget earnings and EBITDA. Free Cashflow is by far the best number to refer to." Jae Jun's backtesting of his own FCF Cows screen found that it beat the S&P 500 in six out of nine years between 2001 and 2009. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Year Return: 23.6%
Neglected Firms Screen

Neglected Firms is a value investing strategy inspired by Ludwig Chincarini and Daehwan Kim in their book, Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management. It uses value and quality measures to find neglected shares that are under-researched by analysts and potentially misunderstood by investors. It looks for companies with low analyst coverage, above average earnings growth and that are cheaply priced according to their price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios. Chincarini and Kim explain: "It is likely that neglected firm's stock prices do not reflect all the relevant information available and that their prices will react sluggishly to relevant news. This opens a window of time and opportunity for an astute investor to purchase undervalued, neglected stocks and reap the rewards when the market recognizes the stocks' true values." Academic research by Avner Arbel and Paul Strebel found that between 1972 and 1976 comparatively neglected S&P stocks easily outperformed those that were well researched. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 21.0%
Martin Zweig Growth Screen

Martin Zweig Growth is a growth at a reasonable price investing strategy based on an approach explained by US investor Martin Zweig in his book, Winning on Wall Street. It combines a focus on growth characteristics, value attraction and market timing. It uses various measures of earnings and sales growth and uses the price-to-earnings ratio as a valuation tool. Zweig's strategy also looks for relatively strong price action. Zweig wrote: "I've found that investors who rely on crystal balls frequently wind up with crushed glass. I'm satisfied if I can predict a market trend, get in tune with it and stay with that trend for as long as it lasts." Zweig was a reputed US money manager back during 1990s as well as an investment newsletter writer. During the 15 years that it was monitored (1980 - 1995), his newsletter returned an average of 15.9% per year. more »

Growth Investing
3 Year Return: 20.5%
52 Week High Momentum Screen

52 Week High Momentum is momentum strategy that was explored in a paper called The 52-Week High and Momentum Investing by academics Thomas George and Chuan-Yang Hwang. It capitalises on the positive momentum effect which appears to cause stocks that are at, or close to, their 52 week high prices continuing to outperform. It is believed to work because investors tend to under-react to positive news about previously successful stocks and are reluctant to bid their prices higher, even if the positive news warrants it. When the full impact of the information prevails, and the 52 week high is broken, the market "wakes up" and prices see further gains. George and Hwang wrote: "Our results indicate that the 52-week measure has predictive power whether or not individual stocks have had extreme past returns. This suggests that price level is important, and is consistent with an anchor-and-adjust bias." The original research found that, between 1963 - 2001, the average monthly gain to this strategy assuming a 6 month hold was 0.45% - "about twice as large as those associated with other momentum strategies". more »

Momentum Investing
3 Year Return: 20.4%
Piotroski High F-Score Screen

The Piotroski F-Score Screen is a quality strategy outlined by the famed academic Professor Joseph Piotroski and investigated further in a 2011 paper titled "Identifying expectation errors in Value/Glamour stocks". The strategy hunts for the best quality shares in the market regardless of price. In this version of the screen we have selected the highest scoring stocks in the market using Piotroski's nine-point fundamental checklist called the F-Score. While the F-Score was originally used only for filtering value stocks, Piotroski discovered it was just as effective for filtering glamour stocks: "Firms experiencing the strongest improvement in fundamentals (FSCORE ?7) generate a mean size-adjusted return of 5.5 percent annually". What Piotroski essentially was saying was that the highest scoring stocks returned 5.5% more than the market - these findings have been backed up by independent research by Societe Generale. Perhaps as a result the F-Score has become extremely popular with investors and is a core component of the Stockopedia StockReports. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 20.0%
Muhlenkamp's ROE Screen

Ronald Muhlenkamp Return on Equity is a quality investing strategy based on an approach used by US fund manager Ronald Muhlenkamp. It combines quality and value factors by looking for companies with a high return on equity (ROE) at a reasonable price. ROE is a measure of how much profit a company earns compared to the amount of shareholder equity on its balance sheet. Muhlenkamp compares ROE with other growth measures to find stocks that are likely to be highly cash generative. He said: "You want to be sure that the companies you own can survive whatever the heck happens." Muhlenkamp's methods were analysed by Ludwig B Chincarini and Daehwan Kim in Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management. They found that the Muhlenkamp fund averaged an 18.38% annual rate of return for the 19 years to 2004, versus 12.07% for the S&P 500. more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 19.9%
John Templeton Bargain Screen

John Templeton Value is a value investing strategy based on the rules used by US investor Sir John Templeton. It combines value and growth factors to identify stocks trading at cheap prices but with a positive long-term outlook. The value components include the price-to-book and price-to-earnings ratios, while the growth rules focus on strong earnings and margins, and low debt. Sir John wrote: "Bull markets are born on pessimism, grow on skepticism, mature on optimism, and die on euphoria. The time of maximum pessimism is the best time to buy, and the time of maximum optimism is the best time to sell." His Templeton Growth Fund delivered a 13.8% annualised return from 1954 to 2004, versus 11.1% by the S&P 500 over the same period. Sir John also put a great deal of importance on qualitative factors, such as quality products, cost controls, and the intelligent use of earnings by management. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 19.8%
The Screen of Screens

The Screen of Screens is a blended investment approach devised by Stockopedia. It picks stocks that are appearing most frequently across all the 'Guru Screens' tracked by Stockopedia - be they quality, value, momentum, growth or income (excluding short-selling strategies). A stock must be appearing on at least four strategies before it can qualify for the Screen of Screens. Ed Page Croft, CEO of Stockopedia, says: ?One benefit of a blended approach such as the Screen of Screens is that it builds a portfolio exposed to many driving factors of stock returns at once.? By definition, this strategy tends to highlight a list of relatively defensive stocks because they exhibit good fundamentals across a wide range of investing disciplines. The strategy was highlighted in an Financial Times feature by David Stevenson titled: "Stock screens to net the ones that get away". In it he said: "You need to use a website or system that can run the screens for you, and then identify the stocks that come up most often in each of them, which is exactly what Stockopedia has done." more »

Quality Investing
3 Year Return: 17.4%
Charles Kirkpatrick Bargain Screen

Charles Kirkpatrick Bargain is a rules based strategy inspired by US investment strategist Charles Kirkpatrick's work in his excellent Beat the Market. Kirkpatrick has established strategies for finding growth and value stocks. His bargain strategy concentrates on value and momentum factors, with a very precise requirement for the price to sales ratio. Kirkpatrick's testing of of relative price-to-sales ratio rankings found that it was most effective between the 17th and 42nd percentiles in terms of cheapness. Initial testing of the Bargain Model was promising but Kirkpatrick said that several more years of testing were needed before labeling it a success. Kirkpatrick wrote: "As a result of these studies of relative selection methods, I decided to create a new list, called the 'Bargain List' that would incorporate the best triggers found so far and would only include value and price strength." more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Year Return: 17.1%
Beneish M-Score Screen

The Beneish M-Score is a checklist for identifying stocks that might be manipulating their earning figures. It was created by US finance Professor Messod Daniel Beneish and presented in a paper called The Predictable Cost of Earnings Manipulation. The M-Score is a red flag indicator that is often used as part of a short selling strategy. It calculates and distils eight different accounting variables into a single score. Generally, a score greater than -1.78 (i.e. a less negative or positive number) indicates an increased likelihood of a firm being an earnings manipulator. Beneish wrote: "We show that firms with a high probability of overstated earnings have lower future earnings, less persistent income-increasing accruals, and lower future returns." The M-score strategy apparently generated a hedged return of nearly 14% per year, mostly from the short positions. more »

Short Selling
3 Year Return: 16.8%
Kenneth Fisher Price to Sales Screen

Kenneth Fisher Value is a value investing strategy based on the approach of US investor Kenneth Fisher, who wrote Super Stocks. The strategy aims to find value stocks but also considers some of the growth factors that were suggested by Ken Fisher's father, Philip Fisher. It looks specifically for stocks that appear undervalued based on the price-to-sales ratio. It also looks for low gearing, a history of earning growth, strong net margins and positive free cash flow. Ken Fisher wrote: "Very few investors have a rational basis for valuing growth stocks in the face of a lack of earnings. The stock loses supporters and falls, in time, much too far. The best managements react to difficulties and overcome them. In time, sales pick up. Later, profits begin to pick up. Simultaneously with the profit resurgence, the stock price begins to rebound." Latterly, Ken Fisher has suggested that the price-to-sales ratio has become less effective for identifying undervalued shares, however it continues to be widely used by investors. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 14.9%
James O'Shaugnessy's Cornerstone Value

James O'Shaughnessy Cornerstone Value is a value investing strategy presented by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. His extensive backtesting found that value investing works particularly well with large capitalisation stocks with above average sales and cashflow, high levels of share liquidity, which were then sorted for the highest dividend yield. O'Shaughnessy said: "Generally speaking, when things are going against you, as they inevitably will, you have to stick to the underlying strategy? Only by doing so will you be around for when it comes rebounding back." He found that this value strategy produced an annual compound return of 15% between 1954 and 1996, compared to 8.3% for the S&P 500 index. O'Shaughnessy has continued to conduct detailed analysis of Standard & Poor's Compustat database to identify the most effective investing strategies. more »

Value Investing
3 Year Return: 13.7%
Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain Screen

Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain is a deep value 'bargain' investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. This is a simple value approach that looks for companies with a market capitalisation that is less than their net current asset value. NCAV is the calculation of current assets minus current liabilities. Ben Graham wrote: "You are neither right nor wrong because the crowd disagrees with you. You are right because your data and reasoning are right." In a study by Henry Oppenhemier in the Financial Analysts Journal, the mean return from discounted net current asset stocks over a 13-year period was 29.4% per year versus 11.5% per year for the NYSE-AMEX Index. Ben Graham advocated buying stocks that, if they were to collapse tomorrow, should still produce a positive return because of the underlying asset backing. To reduce exposure to individual failures, he also looked for a margin of safety of about 33% and suggested diversifying between at least 30 stocks. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Year Return: 12.5%
T Rowe Price Screen

Thomas Rowe Price Jr Growth is a growth-at-a-reasonable-price investing strategy based on the approach of US fund manager Thomas Rowe Price, Jr. It combines growth and value rules, with a focus on improving earnings, margins and positive cashflow together with a reasonable price-to-earnings ratio. Rowe Price said: "A forward-looking investor must be able to reasonably assess and evaluate the currents and the tides and be prepared to reckon with winds or storms, which are unpredictable." A screen based on these rules tracked by the American Association of Individual Investors returned 22.6% in the five years to 2015. Rowe Price founded his own investment firm T.Rowe Price Associates in 1937, which today manages in excess of $730bn of assets. more »

Growth Investing
3 Year Return: 10.9%
Let’s get you setup so you get the most out of our service
Done, Let's add some stocks
Brilliant - You've created a folio! Now let's add some stocks to it.

  • Apple (AAPL)

  • Shell (RDSA)

  • Twitter (TWTR)

  • Volkswagon AG (VOK)

  • McDonalds (MCD)

  • Vodafone (VOD)

  • Barratt Homes (BDEV)

  • Microsoft (MSFT)

  • Tesco (TSCO)
Save and show me my analysis
Foliobuilder