+ Create a Screen Read the Guide Watch the Video

Screening Strategies

67 strategies sorted by
Walter Schloss 'New Lows' Screen

Walter Schloss New Lows is a value investing strategy based on an approach used by Walter Schloss, who was a disciple of value investing legend Benjamin Graham. The strategy uses value and price factors as its main rules. It searches for companies that are trading below book value, using the price-to-book ratio, and at prices that are close to new lows. Schloss said: "We want to buy cheap stocks based on a small premium over book value, usually a depressed market price, a record that goes back at least 20 years?and one that doesn't have much debt." Between 1956 and 2000, Schloss's fund produced a compound annual growth rate of 15.7%. In a 1994 shareholder letter, Warren Buffett wrote: "Walter continues to outperform managers who work in temples filled with paintings, staff and computers. And he accomplishes this feat by rummaging among the cigar butts on the floor of capitalism." more »

Bargain Stocks
5 Year Return: 183.8%
James Montier Trinity of Risk Screen

James Montier Trinity of Risk is a short selling strategy that uses rules suggested by economist and equity strategist James Montier, who wrote Value Investing. He based the approach on three risk factors highlighted by value investor Benjamin Graham: Valuation Risk, Earnings Risk and Financial Risk. It identifies companies that could be overvalued, have poor quality earnings and might be financially distressed. Specifically it uses the Graham & Dodd price-to-earnings ratio and looks for companies that are reporting exceptionally high earnings growth but fail the Altman Z Score of balance sheet risk. James Montier wrote: "Risk isn't a number, it is a concept or a notion? Rather than running around obsessing on the pseudoscience of risk management, investors should concentrate on understanding the nature of this trinity of risks." Short selling shares can be very risky but the Trinity of Risk can still be used as an indicator of which stocks should be avoided. more »

Short Selling
5 Year Return: 109.1%
Tiny Titans

James O'Shaughnessy Tiny Titans is a small-cap momentum investing strategy set out by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. It combines momentum and value factors and focuses on stocks capitalised at greater than £15m but less than £150m. Its key measures include the price to sales ratio and 1-year relative strength. O'Shaughnessy wrote: "Studies are nearly unanimous in their findings that small stocks (those in the lowest two deciles) do significantly better than large ones. We too have found tremendous returns from tiny stocks." He found that this strategy produced an annual compound return of 20.05% between 1963 and 2009. In 2012, O'Shaughnessy updated the strategy rules by replacing price-to-sales as the key value metric with 6 composited value factors. more »

Momentum Investing
5 Year Return: 108.6%
Jim Slater ZULU Principle Screen

Jim Slater Zulu Principle is a growth investing strategy inspired by UK investor Jim Slater in his book, The Zulu Principle. The strategy combines growth, value, quality and momentum factors. Its most famous ratio is the price-earnings-growth factor (PEG) which compares a company's forecast price-to-earnings ratio with its forecast earnings-per-share growth rate. It also looks for a high return on capital employed and positive relative price strength in small and mid-cap shares. Jim Slater wrote: "Most leading brokers cannot spare the time and money to research smaller stocks. You are therefore more likely to find a bargain in this relatively under-exploited area of the stock market." Jim Slater's son Mark Slater uses Zulu Principle-inspired rules at his MFM Slater Growth Fund, which achieved a total return of 61% over the three years to November 2014. Jim Slater is one of the UK's most popular home-grown investors and his strategy is well followed. more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 98.1%
Price Momentum Screen

Price Momentum is a momentum investing strategy first credited to research by academics Narasimhan Jegadeesh and Sheridan Titman in their paper, Returns to buying winners and selling losers. As its core measure it looks for the top 25% of stocks in the market ranked by their relative price strength over six and 12 months. Research into momentum strategies has shown that previously winning stocks have a tendency to keep rising in price over the medium term, while previous losers tend to keep falling. Academics and professionals have credited this anomaly to investors being slow to absorb the implications of positive news about stocks, which causes prices to drift up over time. In their 1993 paper, Jegadeesh and Titman wrote: "The strategy we examine in most detail, which selects stocks based on their past 6-month returns and holds them for 6 months, realises a compounded excess return of 12.01% per year on average." more »

Momentum Investing
5 Year Return: 95.8%
William O'Neil CAN-SLIM-esque screen

The William O'Neil CAN-SLIM-esque strategy is a growth investing strategy inspired by a proprietary model devised and owned by US investor and publisher William O'Neill. It focuses on growth metrics but also has a momentum component to determine when stocks should be bought and sold. The 7-pronged formula focuses on Current Earnings, Annual Earnings, New Highs, Products or Management, Supply & Demand for the shares, Leaders over Laggards in a sector, Institutional Support and Market conditions. William O'Neill wrote: "What seems too high and risky to the majority generally goes higher and what seems low and cheap generally goes lower." Studies by the American Association of Individual Investors in the US have found that investing rules based on O'Neill's approach have been some of the most successful over the last decade. The so called 'CANSLIM' acronym is a registered trademark of Investors Business Daily, and the approach has become famous and well followed in the USA. more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 76.1%
Piotroski F-Score Price to Book Value Screen

The Piotroski F-Score P/B is the classic value strategy by famous finance academic Joseph Piotroski. Originally published in a 2000 research paper titled "Value Investing: The use of historical financial statement information to separate winners from losers", the strategy hunts for the highest quality shares amongst a deep value basket. In this version of the screen, the cheapest 20% of the market by their Price to Book ratio are first selected, and filtered further to find those with the most improving fundamental health trends using the Piotroski F-Score. Piotroski developed the F-Score system after observing that: "In that mix of bargain companies, you have some that are just stellar. Their performance turns around. People become optimistic about the stock, and it really takes off. However half of the firms languish; continue to perform poorly and eventually delist or enter bankruptcy." Piotroski's back-tests over 20 years showed that his formula could improve the returns from typical value investing strategies by at least 7.5% annually and is especially effective amongst small caps. Investors should beware the low liquidity shares in this screen can be expensive to trade. more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: 69.5%
Free Cash Flow Cows Screen

Free Cash Flow Cows is a deep value bargain strategy inspired by the investment writer, Jae Jun at Old School Value. It looks for companies that appear to be cheaply priced compared to the amount of free cash flow they generate. In particular, they should be stable, cash rich companies where free cash flow is actually growing. Among the ratios used in this strategy is Enterprise Value to Free Cash Flow and Free Cash Flow to Long Term Debt. Jae Jun says: "When it comes to true profitability, forget earnings and EBITDA. Free Cashflow is by far the best number to refer to." Jae Jun's backtesting of his own FCF Cows screen found that it beat the S&P 500 in six out of nine years between 2001 and 2009. more »

Bargain Stocks
5 Year Return: 68.8%
Naked Trader-esque Screen

Robbie Burns Naked Trader is a growth investing strategy based on the rules set out by Robbie Burns in his book, The Naked Trader: How Anyone Can Make Money Trading Shares. It uses a wide range of measures spanning growth, value and price momentum factors and focuses on small and mid-cap stocks. Burns also uses a number of non-financial, qualitative criteria in his investment analysis. He says: "I look at everything I can, and much of the research involves trying to pick out the negative things - I guess I'm trying to put myself off! I use every scrap of info I have to come to a decision - and so should you." Between 2002 and 2005, Burns wrote a column for the Sunday Times, 'My DIY Pension', and apparently doubled the money from £40,000 to £80,000 over this period. By mid-2011 he had turned this into £250,000. more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 67.3%
Peter Lynch Growth Screen

Peter Lynch Growth is a growth investing strategy inspired by the approach of former Fidelity fund manager Peter Lynch, who wrote One Up on Wall Street. It looks for consistently profitable, relatively unknown, low-debt, reasonably priced stocks with high, but not excessive, growth. Among the criteria used, the strategy looks for stocks with a low price to earnings growth rate (PEG). Peter Lynch wrote: "If you stay half-alert, you can pick the spectacular performers right from your place of business or out of the neighborhood shopping mall, and long before Wall Street discovers them." Lynch managed Fidelity's Magellan Fund between 1977 and 1990 and during the time racked up average annualised gains of close to 30%. He urged investors to adopt a bottom-up investing process and "buy what you know". more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 66.9%
Growth at a Reasonable Price Screen

Growth at a Reasonable Price (GARP) is a strategy that aims to highlight companies that are growing but still reasonably priced by the market. It's an approach suggested by journalist and investor David Stevenson in his book, Smarter Stock Picking. It uses a combination of value, growth, quality and momentum measures. They include earnings-per-share growth, a below average price-to-earnings ratio, a high return on capital employed and a share price with positive relative strength. David Stevenson says: "At the core of GARP is is a simple desire: to benefit from a double whammy of growing earnings and a growing PE ratio that reflects this growth of earnings." more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 63.8%
Dreman Low Price to Cash Flow Screen

David Dreman Low Price to Cashflow is a contrarian value strategy developed by the famous US investment manager and author David Dreman in his book Contrarian Investment Strategies. It uses a basic value filter of selecting the cheapest 40% of the market by Price to Cashflow ratio and filtering further for quality according to company size, financial strength and growth. Dreman favours cash flow over earnings: "If we take two companies with similar outlooks, markets, products, and management talent, the one with the higher cashflow will usually be the more rewarding stock. In investing, as in your personal finances, cash is king." Dreman's studies showed that the cheapest 20% of the market by P/CF outperformed the most expensive 20% by 6.8% annually. Dreman cautions towards a buy and hold approach because "transaction costs are often not recognized by investors, but can be very expensive". more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: 55.0%
Charles Kirkpatrick Growth Screen

Charles Kirkpatrick Growth is a strategy pioneered by Charles Kirkpatrick, the renowned US investment strategist who wrote Beat the Market & many books on technical analysis. It combines relative growth and momentum factors in large capitalisation stocks. Specifically it looks for the top 20% of shares with the strongest share price vs 130-day Moving Average and then the top 10% with the strongest growth in operating profit. Kirkpatrick reinforced his strategy by studying point-and-figure charts to determine whether a stock was in an uptrend, which helped to guide his trading decisions. In an award winning paper by Kirkpatrick, entitled Stock Selection: A Test of Relative Stock Values Reported over 17 ½ Years, he wrote: "Relative price strength and relative reported earnings growth, when calculated in the manner of this study, showed superior results when compared to market averages." In Beat the Market, Kirkpatrick claimed that his stock-picking technique had outperformed the S&P 500's performance by 7.7x over 25 years. more »

Growth Investing
5 Year Return: 54.8%
Josef Lakonishok Momentum Screen

Josef Lakonishok Momentum is a strategy that uses price and earnings momentum to identify undervalued companies just at the point when the market is starting to recognise them. It is inspired by detailed research by academic and fund manager Josef Lakonishok, who co-wrote the paper Contrarian Investment, Extrapolation, and Risk. The strategy combines value and momentum factors, including the price-to-earnings ratio, relative strength and earnings surprises. Lakonishok wrote: "Regardless of the reason, some investors get overly excited about stocks that have done very well in the past and buy them up, so that these 'glamour' stocks become overpriced. Similarly, they overreact to stocks that have done very badly, oversell them, and these out-of-favour 'value' stocks become underpriced." A Lakonishok-inspired strategy tracked by the American Association of Individual Investors returned 13.9% in the 10 years to the end of 2014, versus 5.4% for the S&P 500. more »

Momentum Investing
5 Year Return: 47.4%
Best Dividends Screen

Best Dividends is an income strategy inspired by research into high yield investing by the American Association of Individual Investors. It is based on the premise that a stock's dividend yield will rise if its share price falls. The screen aims to identify which of these value shares is best placed to bounce back in price and be able to sustain dividend payouts. To do this it looks for a 5-year average yield of more than 5%, a track record of dividend growth and a conservative dividend payout ratio. It's an approach that echoes David Dreman's High Dividend value strategy. Dreman found that between 1970 and 2010 high yield stocks beat the market by nearly 1% and outperformed no or low yield stocks by 4%. more »

Income Investing
5 Year Return: 47.3%
Earnings Upgrade Momentum Screen

Earnings Forecast Upgrades is a momentum strategy set out by US academics Phillip McKnight and Steven Todd in research that examined how analyst forecasts affect share prices. It focuses on finding momentum stocks by highlighting those that are receiving the highest levels of upgraded earnings forecasts from analysts. It looks at both the number of analysts that have raised their forecasts on a share over the past month, and the overall percentage earnings-per-share increase among the consensus of analysts. McKnight and Todd claimed: "Stocks with the greatest number of upwards revisions in earnings, net of downward revisions, earn significantly higher returns than otherwise similar stocks." The researchers examined a portfolio of European shares and found that the 20% with the highest net upward revisions outperformed the lowest 20% by over 16% a year. Earnings upgrades are one way of finding stocks with 'earnings momentum'; those that have received upward earnings revisions are likely to do so again in the future. more »

Momentum Investing
5 Year Return: 45.1%
David Dreman Low PE Screen

David Dreman Low Price to Earnings is a value strategy developed by the renowned US fund manager and author David Dreman in his book Contrarian Investment Strategies. It uses a basic value filter of selecting the cheapest 40% of the market by P/E ratio and filtering further for quality according to company size, financial strength and growth. Dreman favoured the P/E strategy above all others: "Our money management firm uses the low-PE method as it's core strategy, but also utilizes the other 3 contrarian strategies extensively." Dreman's studies showed that the cheapest 20% of the market by P/E outperformed the most expensive 20% by 6.7% annually. It should be cautioned that Dreman's portfolio did suffer in the 2008 financial crisis due to an overweighting of low P/E banks. Dreman though continues to evangelise the power of contrarian investing to counter behavioural biases. more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: 44.3%
Dividend Achievers Screen

Dividend Achievers is an income strategy inspired by an index run by Nasdaq OMX. It looks for companies that have grown their cash dividend payouts for at least the past five consecutive years. Apart from the dividend growth streak, this strategy looks for companies with reasonable share trading liquidity, strong cash reserves, a solid balance sheet and a proven record of consistent earnings growth. In his book Beating the Street, investing legend Peter Lynch, said: "The dividend is such an important factor in the success of many stocks that you could hardly go wrong by making an entire portfolio of companies that have raised their dividends for 10 to 20 years in a row." According to M&G Investments, the total cumulative return from the S&P 500 in the 10 years to 2011, with dividends reinvested, was 32%. But the return soared to 136% by investing solely in US companies that had grown their dividends for at least 25 consecutive years. more »

Income Investing
5 Year Return: 43.8%
Piotroski F-Score Price to Earnings Value Screen

The Piotroski F-Score P/E is a value strategy developed by the renowned finance professor Joseph Piotroski, published in a 2000 research paper titled "Value Investing: The use of historical financial statement information to separate winners from losers". The strategy hunts for the best quality shares amongst a deep value basket. In this version of the screen, the cheapest 20% of the market by their P/E ratio are selected, and filtered further for the highest scoring companies using a nine-point fundamental checklist called the Piotroski F-Score. Piotroski developed the system after observing that: "In that mix of bargain companies, you have some that are just stellar. Their performance turns around. People become optimistic about the stock, and it really takes off. However half of the firms languish; continue to perform poorly and eventually delist or enter bankruptcy." Piotroski's back-tests over 20 years showed that his formula could improve the returns from typical value investing strategies by at least 7.5% annually and is especially effective amongst small caps. Investors should beware the low liquidity shares in this screen can be expensive to trade. more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: 42.5%
Richard Beddard's Nifty Thrifty Screen

Richard Beddard Nifty Thrifty is an investing strategy based on the approach of UK investor and journalist, Richard Beddard of Interactive Investor. It combines quality and value factors using Joel Greenblatt's Magic Formula and Joseph Piotroski's F-Score. The Magic Formula ranks stocks for value and quality using the earnings yield and return on capital as its key metrics. The F-Score is a 9-point checklist of financial health, of which stocks qualifying for this strategy must pass at least 5. Beddard said: "I don't really see how you can be an investor if you're not trying to understand businesses; how they make money, and what makes them go bust." Between June 2010 and December 2014, Beddard's own Nifty Thrifty portfolio had returned 47%. more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: 39.3%
Let’s get you setup so you get the most out of our service
Done, Let's add some stocks
Brilliant - You've created a folio! Now let's add some stocks to it.

  • Apple (AAPL)

  • Shell (RDSA)

  • Twitter (TWTR)

  • Volkswagon AG (VOK)

  • McDonalds (MCD)

  • Vodafone (VOD)

  • Barratt Homes (BDEV)

  • Microsoft (MSFT)

  • Tesco (TSCO)
Save and show me my analysis