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Screening Strategies

67 strategies sorted by
Buffettology-esque Historical Growth Screen

Warren Buffett Historical Growth is a quality investing strategy inspired by an interpretation of Warren Buffett's investment approach by Mary Buffett and David Clark in their book, The New Buffettology. It is a strategy that combines Buffett's focus on value and business quality. To work out whether the stock is reasonably valued, the strategy uses historical earnings growth; the higher that growth rate is, the more likely it is that the company has a durable competitive advantage. The strategy also looks for low debt and a high earnings yield, return on equity and return on capital employed. In The New Buffettology, Mary Buffett and David Clark explain: "Historical per share earnings that are both strong and show an upward trend indicate a durable competitive advantage." Remember, Buffett is famous for looking beyond financial measures when examining the quality of a business franchise. more »

Quality Investing
5 Year Return: -24.1%
Benjamin Graham Defensive Investor Screen

Benjamin Graham Defensive Investor is a demanding, deep value 'bargain' investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. The strategy focuses on value stocks with good quality financial characteristics. It uses price-to-earnings as a valuation measure and looks for larger companies with a consistent track record of earnings and dividend growth, manageable debt and a high current ratio. Ben Graham wrote: "An investment operation is one which, upon thorough analysis, promises safety of principal and an adequate return. Operations not meeting these requirements are speculative." Defensive Investor is a stricter approach than Ben Graham's enterprising strategy, which look for unpopular companies, special situations and 'bargain' issues. more »

Bargain Stocks
5 Year Return: -25.4%
Earnings Downgrade Momentum Screen

Earnings Forecast Downgrades is a short selling and red flag strategy identified in a research paper by academics Philipp McKnight and Steven Todd, called Analyst Forecasts and the Cross Section of European Stock Returns. It looks for stocks experiencing earnings forecast downgrades by analysts as a potential trigger of negative momentum. They found that the positive returns from an earnings upgrade portfolio were large and persistent, whereas the sell portfolio generated a near zero return because bad news was quickly 'priced-in'. While the strategy on its own may be difficult to profit from, it still highlights stocks that should perhaps be avoided, or warrant careful additional research. McKnight and Todd wrote: "We find differences in the return continuation patterns of stocks with upward versus downward revisions, namely, bad news travels quickly, but good news travels slowly." more »

Short Selling
5 Year Return: -29.1%
Beneish M-Score Screen

The Beneish M-Score is a checklist for identifying stocks that might be manipulating their earning figures. It was created by US finance Professor Messod Daniel Beneish and presented in a paper called The Predictable Cost of Earnings Manipulation. The M-Score is a red flag indicator that is often used as part of a short selling strategy. It calculates and distils eight different accounting variables into a single score. Generally, a score greater than -1.78 (i.e. a less negative or positive number) indicates an increased likelihood of a firm being an earnings manipulator. Beneish wrote: "We show that firms with a high probability of overstated earnings have lower future earnings, less persistent income-increasing accruals, and lower future returns." The M-score strategy apparently generated a hedged return of nearly 14% per year, mostly from the short positions. more »

Short Selling
5 Year Return: -39.3%
Negative Enterprise Value Screen

Negative Enterprise Value is a deep value bargain strategy inspired by the writings of investment writer, Jae Jun. It looks for companies that are priced so cheaply by the market that their cash balance is worth more than their enterprise value (the sum of the company's market cap and total long term debts). On paper, these stocks present an arbitrage opportunity: you could buy all of the debt and equity using the company's cash to cover the cost and simply pocket the difference. Jae Jun says: "If done correctly, it looks like this strategy is hugely profitable, but it does come with a lot of volatility." Jae Jun's back-testing for the US market exhibited significant outperformance over a 10 year period. A word of warning: company cash balances change all the time, so it's essential to know precisely how much cash a company has got. Likewise, make sure all debts are taken into account when it comes to calculating enterprise value. more »

Bargain Stocks
5 Year Return: -47.3%
James Montier 'Unholy Trinity' Screen

James Montier Unholy Trinity is a three point short selling strategy inspired by research by economist and equity strategist James Montier called Joining The Dark Side: Pirates, Spies and Short Sellers The approach uses three risk factors to identify stocks that might be overvalued, financially weak and poorly managed. It uses the price-to-sales ratio to find companies that appear to be overvalued based on their revenues. It looks for signs of low quality by finding stocks that score less than 3 out of 9 on the Piotroski F-Score of financial health. Finally, Montier looks for companies where asset growth could be excessive, based on the theory that management tend to be wasteful allocators of capital. James Montier wrote: "It never ceases to amaze me that whenever a major corporate declines the short sellers are suddenly painted as financial equivalents of psychopaths. This is madness, rather than examining the exceptionally poor (and sometimes criminal) decisions that the corporate itself took, the short sellers are hauled over the coals." Montier found that between 1985 and 2007 a portfolio of Unholy Trinity stocks rebalanced annually would have declined over 6% p.a. compared to a market that was rising at the rate of 13% p.a. in Europe. Short selling shares can be very risky but the Unholy Trinity can still be used as an indicator of which stocks should be avoided. more »

Short Selling
5 Year Return: -50.1%
Charles Kirkpatrick Value Screen

Charles Kirkpatrick Value is a strategy loosely based on the approach of US investment strategist & technician Charles Kirkpatrick, who wrote Beat the Market. It combines relative value, growth and momentum factors and is derived from Kirkpatrick's successful Growth Model. Concerned that growth strategies are susceptible to market downturns, Kirkpatrick devised a value approach that uses the price-to-sales ratio as a risk filter. This interpretation of the screen looks for the cheapest 30% of stocks based on price-to-sales, together with the top 20% of shares with the strongest 130-day Moving Average and then the top 10% with the strongest growth in operating profit. Kirkpatrick wrote: "When I read O'Shaughnessy's book What Works on Wall Street, I discovered from his tests that one way to potentially screen for risks initially was to use the price-to-sales ratio. Unlike O'Shaughnessy, who used the raw figure and set a limit, I used a relative calculation." Can we dig up any performance figures from his book? more »

Value Investing
5 Year Return: -52.1%
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