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Screening Strategies

67 strategies sorted by
Negative Enterprise Value Screen

Negative Enterprise Value is a deep value bargain strategy inspired by the writings of investment writer, Jae Jun. It looks for companies that are priced so cheaply by the market that their cash balance is worth more than their enterprise value (the sum of the company's market cap and total long term debts). On paper, these stocks present an arbitrage opportunity: you could buy all of the debt and equity using the company's cash to cover the cost and simply pocket the difference. Jae Jun says: "If done correctly, it looks like this strategy is hugely profitable, but it does come with a lot of volatility." Jae Jun's back-testing for the US market exhibited significant outperformance over a 10 year period. A word of warning: company cash balances change all the time, so it's essential to know precisely how much cash a company has got. Likewise, make sure all debts are taken into account when it comes to calculating enterprise value. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Month Return: 45.1%
Benjamin Graham Net Nets Screen

Benjamin Graham Net Nets Bargain is a demanding deep value 'bargain' investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. This value approach looks for stocks that are trading at such a cheap price that you could buy the whole company and sell off all the assets at a profit with near minimal risk. It does that by finding shares with a market capitalisation of less than net net working capital. The calculation makes allowances for the fact that in a fire sale of assets, only a proportion of owed cash and inventory value would be recovered. Ben Graham explained: "No proprietor or majority holder would think of selling what he owned at so ridiculously low a figure? In various ways practically all these bargain issues turned out to be profitable and the average annual result proved much more remunerative than most other investments." Remember, risky and potentially troubled companies will be found using the Net Net rules. Ben Graham suggested diversifying between at least 30 stocks. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Month Return: 18.1%
Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain Screen

Benjamin Graham NCAV Bargain is a deep value 'bargain' investing strategy based on rules suggested by legendary investor, Benjamin Graham, who wrote The Intelligent Investor. This is a simple value approach that looks for companies with a market capitalisation that is less than their net current asset value. NCAV is the calculation of current assets minus current liabilities. Ben Graham wrote: "You are neither right nor wrong because the crowd disagrees with you. You are right because your data and reasoning are right." In a study by Henry Oppenhemier in the Financial Analysts Journal, the mean return from discounted net current asset stocks over a 13-year period was 29.4% per year versus 11.5% per year for the NYSE-AMEX Index. Ben Graham advocated buying stocks that, if they were to collapse tomorrow, should still produce a positive return because of the underlying asset backing. To reduce exposure to individual failures, he also looked for a margin of safety of about 33% and suggested diversifying between at least 30 stocks. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Month Return: 16.9%
John Neff Value Screen

John Neff Value is a value investing strategy based on the rules of successful US fund manager John Neff. It combines demanding value criteria with elements of growth, quality and dividend income. Although he didn't like the term, Neff was a contrarian investor buying good companies with moderate growth and high dividends while out of favour, and selling them once they rose to fair value. One of the tools used by Neff is the Total Return Ratio, which is calculated using the price-to-earnings growth factor (PEG), but adjusted for dividend yield - PEGY. John Neff wrote: "If you buy stocks when they are out of favor and unloved, and sell them into strength when other investors recognize their merits, you'll often go home with handsome gains." During his tenure as manager of Vanguard's Windsor Fund between 1964 and 1995, Neff's average annual total return was 13.7%. more »

Value Investing
3 Month Return: 12.9%
James Montier Trinity of Risk Screen

James Montier Trinity of Risk is a short selling strategy that uses rules suggested by economist and equity strategist James Montier, who wrote Value Investing. He based the approach on three risk factors highlighted by value investor Benjamin Graham: Valuation Risk, Earnings Risk and Financial Risk. It identifies companies that could be overvalued, have poor quality earnings and might be financially distressed. Specifically it uses the Graham & Dodd price-to-earnings ratio and looks for companies that are reporting exceptionally high earnings growth but fail the Altman Z Score of balance sheet risk. James Montier wrote: "Risk isn't a number, it is a concept or a notion? Rather than running around obsessing on the pseudoscience of risk management, investors should concentrate on understanding the nature of this trinity of risks." Short selling shares can be very risky but the Trinity of Risk can still be used as an indicator of which stocks should be avoided. more »

Short Selling
3 Month Return: 10.3%
Richard Driehaus Screen

Richard Driehaus Momentum is a momentum investing strategy inspired by an approach used by US investor Richard Driehaus. It combines a focus on price and earnings momentum in small and mid-cap companies with strong, sustained earnings growth. Importantly, Driehaus wanted to find companies that had produced significant earnings surprises over the previous year by beating analyst forecasts. Driehaus said: "I would much rather invest in a stock that's increasing in price and take the risk that it may begin to decline than invest in a stock that's already in a decline and try to guess when it will turn around." Driehaus's fund management firm Driehaus Capital Management was reported to have delivered compound annual returns of 30% during the 12 years after it was started in 1980. Driehaus was named in Barron's "All-Century" team of the 25 most influential and powerful mutual fund managers in 2000. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 9.5%
Tiny Titans

James O'Shaughnessy Tiny Titans is a small-cap momentum investing strategy set out by US fund manager James O'Shaughnessy in his 1996 book, What Works on Wall Street. It combines momentum and value factors and focuses on stocks capitalised at greater than £15m but less than £150m. Its key measures include the price to sales ratio and 1-year relative strength. O'Shaughnessy wrote: "Studies are nearly unanimous in their findings that small stocks (those in the lowest two deciles) do significantly better than large ones. We too have found tremendous returns from tiny stocks." He found that this strategy produced an annual compound return of 20.05% between 1963 and 2009. In 2012, O'Shaughnessy updated the strategy rules by replacing price-to-sales as the key value metric with 6 composited value factors. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 9.3%
R&D Breakthroughs Screen

R&D Breakthroughs is a quality investing strategy inspired by a screen devised by US journalist Jack Hough, in his book, Your Next Great Stock. It is partly based on research by Louis Chan, Josef Lakonishok and Theodore Sougiannis in paper called The Stock Market Valuation of Research and Development Expenditures. The strategy filters a value screen with quality factors related to how much a company is investing in its future development. It uses the price-to-research ratio to find value and compares R&D investment in relation to growth, sales and assets. The strategy seeks to identify research-led businesses that are investing significantly in future development in order to try to identify their potential future growth before the market does. Louis Chan wrote: "The clearest evidence that high R&D plays a distinctive role arises from stocks with high R&D relative to the market value of equity. Their average return over the following three years is 6.12% per year." more »

Quality Investing
3 Month Return: 7.8%
Walter Schloss 'New Lows' Screen

Walter Schloss New Lows is a value investing strategy based on an approach used by Walter Schloss, who was a disciple of value investing legend Benjamin Graham. The strategy uses value and price factors as its main rules. It searches for companies that are trading below book value, using the price-to-book ratio, and at prices that are close to new lows. Schloss said: "We want to buy cheap stocks based on a small premium over book value, usually a depressed market price, a record that goes back at least 20 years?and one that doesn't have much debt." Between 1956 and 2000, Schloss's fund produced a compound annual growth rate of 15.7%. In a 1994 shareholder letter, Warren Buffett wrote: "Walter continues to outperform managers who work in temples filled with paintings, staff and computers. And he accomplishes this feat by rummaging among the cigar butts on the floor of capitalism." more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Month Return: 7.1%
Value Momentum Screen

Value & Momentum is a strategy that aims to find undervalued stocks with positive price momentum. It is inspired by research by AQR Capital Management as well as the American Association of Individual Investors' "Value on the Move" screen and Jack Hough's "Impatient Value" screen in his book, Your Next Great Stock. The strategy combines value and momentum, which are two disciplines that have been found to work very effectively when combined. It looks for a reasonably low PEG, positive relative strength and a share price within 10% of its 52-week high in companies with sales of more than £100 million. Value and momentum not only provide strong returns but are also negatively correlated. That means that when when one strategy works well, the other lags - one zigs when the other zags. Over time, this helps to create a smoother profit line, as the volatility of each strategy cancels the other out. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 6.8%
Peter Lynch Growth Screen

Peter Lynch Growth is a growth investing strategy inspired by the approach of former Fidelity fund manager Peter Lynch, who wrote One Up on Wall Street. It looks for consistently profitable, relatively unknown, low-debt, reasonably priced stocks with high, but not excessive, growth. Among the criteria used, the strategy looks for stocks with a low price to earnings growth rate (PEG). Peter Lynch wrote: "If you stay half-alert, you can pick the spectacular performers right from your place of business or out of the neighborhood shopping mall, and long before Wall Street discovers them." Lynch managed Fidelity's Magellan Fund between 1977 and 1990 and during the time racked up average annualised gains of close to 30%. He urged investors to adopt a bottom-up investing process and "buy what you know". more »

Growth Investing
3 Month Return: 6.7%
William O'Neil CAN-SLIM-esque screen

The William O'Neil CAN-SLIM-esque strategy is a growth investing strategy inspired by a proprietary model devised and owned by US investor and publisher William O'Neill. It focuses on growth metrics but also has a momentum component to determine when stocks should be bought and sold. The 7-pronged formula focuses on Current Earnings, Annual Earnings, New Highs, Products or Management, Supply & Demand for the shares, Leaders over Laggards in a sector, Institutional Support and Market conditions. William O'Neill wrote: "What seems too high and risky to the majority generally goes higher and what seems low and cheap generally goes lower." Studies by the American Association of Individual Investors in the US have found that investing rules based on O'Neill's approach have been some of the most successful over the last decade. The so called 'CANSLIM' acronym is a registered trademark of Investors Business Daily, and the approach has become famous and well followed in the USA. more »

Growth Investing
3 Month Return: 6.3%
Winning Growth & Income

Winning Growth & Income is a dividend investing strategy inspired by an approach used by American investment analyst Kevin Matras in his book, Finding #1 Stocks. It combines growth and dividend factors by sorting the market for high yielding companies with strong growth characteristics. Apart from a high yield, this strategy looks for companies with an above average return on equity, a below average price-to-earnings ratio and where analysts have been upgrading their earnings forecasts. It also looks for companies with a low beta (the sensitivity of a share price to the movement of the market). Kevin Matras says the screen works for investors that are "looking for good companies with solid revenues that pay a good dividend". In some respects, this strategy is a small cap version of the Large Cap Dividend Attraction strategy. In Matra's original strategy criteria he uses Zacks Rank, which is a metric for analysing analyst forecasts. more »

Income Investing
3 Month Return: 5.3%
Piotroski F-Score Price to Book Value Screen

The Piotroski F-Score P/B is the classic value strategy by famous finance academic Joseph Piotroski. Originally published in a 2000 research paper titled "Value Investing: The use of historical financial statement information to separate winners from losers", the strategy hunts for the highest quality shares amongst a deep value basket. In this version of the screen, the cheapest 20% of the market by their Price to Book ratio are first selected, and filtered further to find those with the most improving fundamental health trends using the Piotroski F-Score. Piotroski developed the F-Score system after observing that: "In that mix of bargain companies, you have some that are just stellar. Their performance turns around. People become optimistic about the stock, and it really takes off. However half of the firms languish; continue to perform poorly and eventually delist or enter bankruptcy." Piotroski's back-tests over 20 years showed that his formula could improve the returns from typical value investing strategies by at least 7.5% annually and is especially effective amongst small caps. Investors should beware the low liquidity shares in this screen can be expensive to trade. more »

Value Investing
3 Month Return: 4.8%
Josef Lakonishok Momentum Screen

Josef Lakonishok Momentum is a strategy that uses price and earnings momentum to identify undervalued companies just at the point when the market is starting to recognise them. It is inspired by detailed research by academic and fund manager Josef Lakonishok, who co-wrote the paper Contrarian Investment, Extrapolation, and Risk. The strategy combines value and momentum factors, including the price-to-earnings ratio, relative strength and earnings surprises. Lakonishok wrote: "Regardless of the reason, some investors get overly excited about stocks that have done very well in the past and buy them up, so that these 'glamour' stocks become overpriced. Similarly, they overreact to stocks that have done very badly, oversell them, and these out-of-favour 'value' stocks become underpriced." A Lakonishok-inspired strategy tracked by the American Association of Individual Investors returned 13.9% in the 10 years to the end of 2014, versus 5.4% for the S&P 500. more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 4.7%
Neglected Firms Screen

Neglected Firms is a value investing strategy inspired by Ludwig Chincarini and Daehwan Kim in their book, Quantitative Equity Portfolio Management. It uses value and quality measures to find neglected shares that are under-researched by analysts and potentially misunderstood by investors. It looks for companies with low analyst coverage, above average earnings growth and that are cheaply priced according to their price-to-earnings and price-to-book ratios. Chincarini and Kim explain: "It is likely that neglected firm's stock prices do not reflect all the relevant information available and that their prices will react sluggishly to relevant news. This opens a window of time and opportunity for an astute investor to purchase undervalued, neglected stocks and reap the rewards when the market recognizes the stocks' true values." Academic research by Avner Arbel and Paul Strebel found that between 1972 and 1976 comparatively neglected S&P stocks easily outperformed those that were well researched. more »

Value Investing
3 Month Return: 4.7%
Free Cash Flow Cows Screen

Free Cash Flow Cows is a deep value bargain strategy inspired by the investment writer, Jae Jun at Old School Value. It looks for companies that appear to be cheaply priced compared to the amount of free cash flow they generate. In particular, they should be stable, cash rich companies where free cash flow is actually growing. Among the ratios used in this strategy is Enterprise Value to Free Cash Flow and Free Cash Flow to Long Term Debt. Jae Jun says: "When it comes to true profitability, forget earnings and EBITDA. Free Cashflow is by far the best number to refer to." Jae Jun's backtesting of his own FCF Cows screen found that it beat the S&P 500 in six out of nine years between 2001 and 2009. more »

Bargain Stocks
3 Month Return: 4.4%
Price Momentum Screen

Price Momentum is a momentum investing strategy first credited to research by academics Narasimhan Jegadeesh and Sheridan Titman in their paper, Returns to buying winners and selling losers. As its core measure it looks for the top 25% of stocks in the market ranked by their relative price strength over six and 12 months. Research into momentum strategies has shown that previously winning stocks have a tendency to keep rising in price over the medium term, while previous losers tend to keep falling. Academics and professionals have credited this anomaly to investors being slow to absorb the implications of positive news about stocks, which causes prices to drift up over time. In their 1993 paper, Jegadeesh and Titman wrote: "The strategy we examine in most detail, which selects stocks based on their past 6-month returns and holds them for 6 months, realises a compounded excess return of 12.01% per year on average." more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 4.2%
Earnings Surprise Screen

Earnings Surprise Momentum is a momentum investing strategy that was identified in research by academics Narasimhan Jegadeesh and Joshua Livnat in their paper, Revenue Surprises and Stock Returns. It specifically looks for companies that managed to significantly beat earnings and sales forecasts in their previous financial results. These 'earnings surprises' have been found to cause medium term increases in share prices. This is believed to be caused by analysts being slow to revise their forecasts and the market failing to adequately 'price-in' the better than expected results. Jegadeesh and Livnat found that the the top 20% of stocks in terms of upside earnings and sales surprises outperformed the market by 5.3%. They wrote: "Although analysts revise their forecasts of future earnings in response to revenue surprises, they are slow to incorporate fully the information in revenue surprises." more »

Momentum Investing
3 Month Return: 4.1%
James Montier 'Cooking the Books' Screen

James Montier Cooking the Books is a short selling strategy based on research by economist and equity strategist James Montier. It uses Low Quality criteria to identify stocks that could be at risk of bad accounting practice. The 6-point C-Score checklist looks at the divergence between net income and cash-flow, increasing days sales outstanding, increasing days sales of inventory, increasing current assets to revenues, declining depreciation relative to property, plant and equipment and high total asset growth. Montier found that the C-Score was even more effective when used to assess stocks that look over-valued on a price-to-sales ratio basis. James Montier wrote: "In good times, few focus on such 'mundane' issues as earnings quality and footnotes. However, this lack of attention to 'detail' tends to come back and bite investors in the arse during bad times." Montier found that stocks with a C-score of 5 and a price-to-sales ratio of greater than 2 tend to generate a negative absolute return of 4% per year. Short selling shares can be very risky but the C-Score can still be used as an indicator of which stocks should be avoided. more »

Short Selling
3 Month Return: 4.1%
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