Small Cap Value Report (Wed 8 Nov 2017) - TRCS, SDM, JPR, MKS, JDW, PSN, PVCS, ZZZ

Wednesday, Nov 08 2017 by
44

Placeholder article posted the night before:

Hi, it's Paul here! A quick reminder that Tracsis (LON:TRCS) results will be out in the morning. I am interviewing the CEO, John McArthur, this Thurs. So if you have any questions, please email them asap simultaneously to me & John, using both the email addresses below;

Paul Scott:   QSCquestions@gmail.com
CEO of Tracsis:   J.McArthur@tracsis.com

I'm trying out an email system, as it saves me the hassle of having to set up an online form. Also it means that me & John both get to see the questions at the same time, so eliminates preparation time for me.


Please note that I added more sections to yesterday's report in the evening. So the full report now includes all the shares that were originally in the header.

Here is yesterday's completed report, to start you off with. It includes sections on;

  • Intercede (profit warning)
  • FeverTree (materially ahead of mkt expects)
  • Blancco Tech (results)
  • Johnston Press (EGM requisition - which has since been declared invalid by the company)
  • Ideagen (trading update)
  • Castleton Tech (interim results)
  • UP Global Sourcing (final results)


I mention this because I was writing very late last night, so readers may not be aware that more sections were added.



Good morning! It's Paul here for the usual small caps report.

I'll also briefly comment on some bellweather large caps today. I think it's well worth keeping an eye on what's happening to consumer-facing, and residential property larger caps. This can often have read-across for smaller caps, and helps me understand where the economy is going - vital information for deciding whether to buy or sell particular shares. I don't see myself as a bottom up, or top down investor - I do both. You have to, otherwise investing decisions wouldn't make much sense.


Marks and Spencer (LON:MKS) - interim results. Adjusted PBT down 5.3% to £219.1m. However, growth in international profits masks a 17.8% fall in UK adjusted operating profit. A stand-out bad number is that store staffing costs in the UK rose 10.3% to £532.5m - I think some of that is pensions cost related, but it's still a startling number. LFL sales growth is elusive, but costs are rising. So I'd be more inclined to go short, rather than…

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As per our Terms of Use, Stockopedia is a financial news & data site, discussion forum and content aggregator. Our site should be used for educational & informational purposes only. We do not provide investment advice, recommendations or views as to whether an investment or strategy is suited to the investment needs of a specific individual. You should make your own decisions and seek independent professional advice before doing so. Remember: Shares can go down as well as up. Past performance is not a guide to future performance & investors may not get back the amount invested.


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Tracsis plc is a holding company. The Company is engaged in the business of software development and consultancy for the rail industry. Its segments include Rail Technology and Services, and Traffic & Data Services. The Rail Technology and Services segment includes its Software, Consultancy and Remote Condition Monitoring Technology, and also includes Ontrac Limited and Ontrac Technology Limited (together being Ontrac). The Traffic & Data Services segment includes data capture, analysis and interpretation of traffic and pedestrian data to aid with the planning, investment and ultimate operations of a transport environment and it also includes SEP Limited (SEP). It provides software products, consultancy services and delivers customized projects to solve a range of problems within the transport and traffic sector. It specializes in solving a range of data capture, reporting and resource optimization problems along with the provision of a range of associated professional services. more »

LSE Price
515p
Change
 
Mkt Cap (£m)
145.1
P/E (fwd)
21.7
Yield (fwd)
0.3

PV Crystalox Solar PLC is a supplier to the photovoltaic industry, producing multicrystalline silicon wafers for use in solar electricity generation systems. The Company's three-stage production process includes Ingot production, block production and wafer production. The Company's subsidiaries include Crystalox Solar Limited and PV Crystalox Solar Silicon GmbH. The Company operates in Japan, Taiwan, Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom and Rest of Europe. more »

LSE Price
21.75p
Change
-0.6%
Mkt Cap (£m)
34.9
P/E (fwd)
n/a
Yield (fwd)
n/a

Stadium Group plc is a provider of integrated electronic technologies. The Company operates through two divisions, including Technology Products, which incorporates wireless, interface and displays, power and stontronics, and integrated Electronic Manufacturing Services (iEMS) provided through design and manufacturing operations in the United Kingdom and Asia. It offers various services, such as design (electronic, mechanical and software), prototype, new product introduction (NPI), global procurement, in house tooling and molding, printed circuit board (PCB) assembly, box build and test, packaging and global logistics. It provides wireless machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity solutions for original equipment manufacturer (OEM) devices in vehicle tracking, telematics, fleet management, smart metering, asset tracking, wearable technology, handheld devices, infotainment and security systems. It serves various manufacturers in the marine, aviation, medical and broadcast industries. more »

LSE Price
82p
Change
 
Mkt Cap (£m)
31.3
P/E (fwd)
7.7
Yield (fwd)
4.0



  Is Tracsis fundamentally strong or weak? Find out More »


77 Comments on this Article show/hide all

Sutherland 8th Nov 58 of 77
1

In reply to Ramridge, post #51

Ramridge. Thank you for your reply. I will look at the company again. I can live with the building sector for the time being but I have noted your comment on liquidity which I will investigate for my self.

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Paul Scott 9th Nov 59 of 77
2

In reply to Graham Ford, post #32

Graham,

You can't do that!! (comparing LFL sales performances for companies which are reporting on different periods).

The point is that very recent LFL sales (which RBG hasn't yet reported) appear to be strong for its competitors Deltic, and the less comparable Wetherspoons. Therefore RBG could also be reporting strong LFL sales growth too? Halloween seems to be a much bigger party event now than in the past.

Regards, Paul.


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Graham Ford 9th Nov 60 of 77

In reply to Paul Scott, post #59

Hi Paul.

I did make the point that these are for different time periods so not exactly comparable. Yes, I happily concede that as we don’t know RGB’s recent sales numbers they may have had a much better hallowe’en than last year. However, the management have been focused on trying to negotiate the sale of the business rather than anything else so it’s not particularly likely in my view that they will have suddenly played a blinder on promoting their hallowe’en season.

Furthermore, I think that the very weak long term LFL sales growth at RGB is illustrative of underlying problems with the format. You yourself have said the food offering is poor. Do you not think that anyone acquiring this business will want/need to spend money and time improving the format? As a former numbers man, would you be content operating a business where the existing outlets were likely to be making less profit each year rather than more (as wage, pension, apprenticeship, rates and supplies all increase at a faster rate than the top line)?

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purpleski 9th Nov 61 of 77
9

In reply to Paul Scott, post #30

Hi Paul

I owe you a reply but time got away from me yesterday.

My view of the EU and Brexit is seen through the lens of my business (French Ski Chalet Holidays), magnified by social circumstances (3/8ths of my immediate family (brothers/sisters) are not UK) and magnified again by people I listen to (the list is enormous and includes the likes of Anatole Kaletsky, Tim Harford, Martin Wolf, Lloyd Blankfien, Jim (Brexit would leave Britain poorer) O'Neil, Guy Spier, etc.

My business, that I have spent half a life time building, is able to function because of our membership of the EU and within that the Free Movement of Labour and the Detached Workers Directive. The business could (will is another matter) continue outside of the UK's membership of the EU but in a much transformed form, less profitable, more complex and more expensive for the client. These various hassles/barriers are likely to not make this worthwhile.

Whilst my business is truly niche, it is my belief that almost any business trading within the EU will be, to one degree or another, effected in a similar fashion and will not in any meaningful time frame be able to replace the losses with trade outside of the EU. I am not saying that they will cease trading, or course not, but sales, employment and margins will reduce. If you have been trading with the EU 27 exclusively, it is a whole different ball game to suddenly attempt to replace some (all) of that lost trade with trade to say China, India, Russia etc. Indeed your choice of markets outside of the EU where the trading enviroment, rule of law and infrastructure is as good as that as we enjoy in the EU is limited.

From a trade point of view I just can not see the overall advantage of exiting the EU; even the Daily Express published a graph recently with the title:

"The scariest chart in the world when it comes to Brexit negotiations" with the sub title

"The vast majority of UK trade is conducted under EU, EEA, or preferential trade agreements"

http://www.express.co.uk/news/...

On the Sterling front devaluation has never led to long term economic prosperity.  When I started (1991) my business the pound was over 3 Swissies to the pound (in 1976 it was just shy of 6). 

The pound would have bought €2.56 (I had to double check when I saw that).

It would have bought Sing$7.35 (Today Sing$1.81)

No we dont know where Sterling is heading but long term I would be short sterling.  Additionally it can only go to parity £1 to 1 cent that is.

I, like you I believe, was and am a rapid Thatcher fan (but am now an ex-Tory with no allegiance), a free marketeer (within a regulated structure), but believe that being a member of the EU is not incompatible with these views.

I could go on but we all have better things to do that read my musings but I will leave you with one thought, Howard Marks of Oaktree Capital wrote (not specifically about Brexit I hasten to add!):

"Nobody knows what will happen; Our mantra at Oaktree is “that those who move forward, but with caution, excel”

Brexiting in this fashion is not moving forward with caution. We will not excel.

I will take Marks over Martin any day!

Best wishes

Michael

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markfletcher 10th Nov 62 of 77

In reply to Wimbledonsprinter, post #38

Thanks for that - I know sdm quite well and I hadn't thought of that until your post but it does make sense to me. However I also think there is something fishy too - the dicrepencies between orders and revenues are huge. I might re-do my analysis using a 24 month lead time and a 36 month lead time. I have noticed other companies reassuring investors with record orders which don't seem to mature to revenue e.g. NCC

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Wimbledonsprinter 10th Nov 63 of 77
1

In reply to markfletcher, post #62

Mark

I would be interested in what you find. At end- August, as far as I can see, the expectations for 2018 sales were £73 million. Subsequently, Power Pax was bought with annual sales of £3.3 million and and EBIT of £0.4 million - but when the H1 numbers came out in mid-Sept, 2018 expected sales remained at £73 million and Profit expectations only marginally moved up. Now in November, 2018 revenue expectations have come down to £70 million - but management are not really explaining why 2018 expectations (acquisition adjusted) should have fallen by £6 million in the space of less than 3 months. The trading statement seemed mostly focused on sales having been deferred from 2017 into 2018.

But my main gripe about Stadium is that they seem addicted to adjusted earnings. I don't pay attention to them anymore - there have been repeated reorganisation (one-off) adjustments and the H12017 numbers included the cost of hiring the new CFO as a one-off adjustment. Therefore, I focus much more on the cash flow number (and while I accept there are short term issues with component sourcing) the expectations now seem to be for negative FCF of more than £3 million in 2017. But the share price has fallen now a long way - if the company can demonstrate it can generate significant FCF in 2018, I might be tempted to buy.

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour

In reply to peterg, post #22

"Tim Martin may be good at selling cheap beer, but he isn't very good at understanding the impact of Brexit on food."

Impact of Brexit on food is when we leave EU, we end CAP. So as a successful businessman in the food & drinks business I suspect Tim Martin has a far better grasp of impact on Brexit on food.In fact I;d wager he is more concerned on impact of "minimum wage" on his business than Brexit.

CAP artificially inflates food price by c 17% at bare minimum.

" Of the remaining 46% 27% came from the EU (0 tariffs) and 19% from the RoW. If we leave the EU with no deal WTO tariffs on EU food would be 22%"

Which completely ignores
a) the EU tariffs levied on Non EU Agricultural produce.Which is why 27% comes from EU, and only 19% from non EU(tariffs would be what % btw?)

Personally I'd rather buy say Oranges from South Africa/Israel instead of Spain - thereby not only getting cheaper food, but also aiding nations less well off than ourselves!! Rinse and repeat across most foodstuffs.

"If we leave the EU with no deal WTO tariffs on EU food would be 22%. "

This is based on the false assumption that post Brexit we'd levy tariffs - we dont have to even if we go to WTO. UK could simply choose to levy 0% tariffs on Agriculture across the board!!!! Or we could cut tariffs such that everyone, EU, & ROTW, subject to 10% - far lower than current 22%.What is important is that we have to be consistent, across the board.

"We could negotiate deals with other countries, but firstly they would take time to negotiate and food prices would rise in a big way for the period - quite possibly years - over which that happened, and at the end of it why would we expect to achieve deals over food supply much better than the 0% tariffs we already have?"

Drive.l
We could simply, under the principle of continuity, just carry over those trade deals that currently exist with EU....So you're being disingenuous at best!

0% tariffs with ROTW is far superior to just 0% tariffs with EU,tariffs with ROTW.

How do you benefit from current set up exactly Peter?
Youre not getting £900,000pa as Heseltine is?

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour

In reply to simoan, post #27

"I would not have thought this a good thing since the average Wetherspoons customer is likely to be hit the hardest by any economic fallout from Brexit. I'd keep my mouth shut if I were him particularly as many of them will over represent the younger vote that turned to Corbyn's Labour at the election... and he doesn't sound like a member of the Jeremy Corbyn fan club to me!"

Presumptuous poppycock. Wetherspoons may not be "your" cup of tea, but plenty of people I know venture there on a regular basis - decent breakfasts for example,absent pretentious ######dom!
I suggest you venture out of your "bubble!"

"I think we should all just agree that no-one has the foggiest what the outcome and subsequent effects on the UK economy will be of Brexit and there's no point perpetuating the same silly lies and half truths that surrounded the referendum way beyond their sell by dates."

Don't dispute that at all but we need to be positive, and,above all, cease stabbing in the back those that are trying to implement the decision of the British people...As a suggestion, best get on the case to Remoanerdom central then!!

"Only the truly ignorant believe they know what will happen. Tim Martin is not alone."

Agreed. Those halfwits at CBI, OECD, IMF are well past their sell by date..wrong as they have been, over ERM, Euro, Financial crisis, and now Brexit One wonders what they'll be utterly flummoxed over next.

Italian banking crisis
Car Lease bubble.

Etc etc.

List is endless.

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Fangorn 11th Nov 66 of 77
1

In reply to danielbird193, post #33

"Tim Martin also neglects to mention that much of the food imported from the continent is unlikely to be substituted by replacements elsewhere. There will always be demand for Italian parmesan cheese and Parma ham, French Bordeaux and camembert, Greek feta cheese, Spanish chorizo, German lager (the list could go on)."

Drivel - plenty of substitutes for most product categories.Whether it be Wine, Cheese, Bacon, Oranges, Olives ,Eggs etc etc

German lager...I'll take Japanese lager over that any day - Asahi, Kirin, Sapporo
(The list could indeed go on!)

"Yes, in theory these products can be substituted for cheaper imitations from other countries, but in all likelihood the demand is pretty inelastic"

Incorrect.Cheaper imitations implies of lower quality..Simply incorrect.But if you'd lived in ASIA you'd know that. Would go near Tsingtao for example, Singha, but Japanese offerings superb.
Tiger beer is also not bad and I say that as a non beer drinker.

Absent tariffs to NON EU produce we'll import a lot more..and we'll also assist the less well off in this world the opportunity to export themselves to some prosperity.

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour
1

In reply to purpleski, post #43

"I personally would agree with you and think that your grasp of the basic economics of food imports/supply/distribution in this country is far better than Mr Martin"

Does Peterg run a food business? Or a business that runs off low margins as Pubs do?

I'd say your opinion is coloured by your Remoaner proclivities frankly! Wasn't surprise to see you agreed with Peterg.

You're all for paying EU E70-100bn as well arent you!!!

"He also does not talk about the likely increase in costs of our own home grown crops because of increased wages that will need to be paid to get the harvest in."

hmmm plenty of people absent jobs in Uk who get welfare for doing sweet fa.
Shouldnt they earn their "handout"
NO?
Why not? After all, there are plenty of people who get up at 6am, commute to work, working a full day,then commute home, for a lowly 18-24,000 pa.

Why should welfare recipients get a free pass?

"wages paid at the bottom of the agricultural ladder for grinding work is pretty shocking but people will bleat if locally grown crops rise in price"

Is that you and your fellow Remoaners bleating from the same bubble?"

I'd happily pay a little bit more if produce was sourced locally. (As I'm sure any true Green Pro Environment Leftie would as well if they dont want to be hypocrites!)

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Fangorn 11th Nov 68 of 77
1

In reply to Rippleog, post #36

Most of the goods listed have reasonable substitutionability unless you're a pretentious snob!

Case in point....

1) French Bordeaux! Erm, I'll take an Argie Malbec over that for starters. Or a Shiraz/Durif.

many Pro EU Remoaners havent lived or worked outside of UK/EU - world is an energetic place, much of which emanates from ASIA or North America(Areas where economic growth, prosperity are on the rise)

Plenty of other examples..

Eg. Oranges - Overpriced from Spain,as a result of Cap or better values for money from South Africa or Israel.

I'd take produce from Israel over Spain any day on taste alone..(No, I'm not Jewish either)
Next

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour
4

In reply to purpleski, post #35


" I am out at my son’s rugby match so will give a fuller reply a bit later but with your last paragraph you are spot on. :-)"

What a bubble you live in then.

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour
4

In reply to purpleski, post #61

"My business, that I have spent half a life time building, is able to function because of our membership of the EU and within that the Free Movement of Labour and the Detached Workers Directive. The business could (will is another matter) continue outside of the UK's membership of the EU but in a much transformed form, less profitable, more complex and more expensive for the client."

And there is the sole reason you voted Remain. Dont fault you for that.

Heseltine thinks similarly - £900k pa farm subsidies!!!!

Personally I place "freedom" far above "self enrichment"

That's why I voted Leave. More to life than money. You need the bare minimum to live on...I-phones $1000, Sky, flash car, cable.blah blah.all redundant

"People I listen to (the list is enormous and includes the likes of Anatole Kaletsky, Tim Harford, Martin Wolf, Lloyd Blankfien, Jim (Brexit would leave Britain poorer) O'Neil, Guy Spier, etc."

Plenty who have a far better win/Lose ratio on being correct over ERM, EURO, Financial Crisis, etc etc disagree with your plethora of naysayers!!!! Your list might be enormous but they've been collectively wrong for last 30 years.,,What did your list of "experts" say over ERM? Euro? Do I really need to remind you!

""The vast majority of UK trade is conducted under EU, EEA, or preferential trade agreements""

Vast majority of UK trade is done with ROTW, and any agreements can be simply rolled over under the principle of continuity!! Agreements signed on a 1 to 28 basis where UK interests were diluted for the other 27 members will now be rolled over, or amended as per 1:1 that will now hold sway.

It was $2 :£ in 2006..Swings n roundabouts..thats why we have a floating currency.

"I, like you I believe, was and am a rapid Thatcher fan (but am now an ex-Tory with no allegiance), a free marketeer (within a regulated structure), but believe that being a member of the EU is not incompatible with these views. "

Are you sure because Maggie was anti a United States of Europe and UK getting sucked in..in fact she was anti Maastricht (obviously even more so Lisbon!!!)

Being an EU member with its protectionism is anathema to being a Thatcherite.I say that as a Thatcherite!!!! You clearly arent. Eu is protectionist.As any basic economic analysis of Single mkt/Customs Union, and CAP will tell you!|

With respect to your

"Nobody knows what will happen; Our mantra at Oaktree is “that those who move forward, but with caution, excel”

Spot on

"Brexiting in this fashion is not moving forward with caution. We will not excel."

Utter defeatist drivel

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purpleski 11th Nov 71 of 77
4

In reply to Fangorn, post #69

I dont understand. Is my 11 year old son not allowed to play rugby and am I not allowed to watch him play?

Your series of comments are pretty unnecessary and bordering on unpleasant.

My mistake of course, I should have stayed clear of the Brexit thing or DM’d Paul.

Anyway he lost the match 6 - 3 if that makes you feel even better but not quite sure why it is a bubble I live in. I started my business in 1993 and at the time had £3.50 in the bank, over the initial 7 years I borrowed £20k from my late mother so that I could survive, in now turns over a couple of million and makes a tidy profit. Is there anything wrong with that? I thought that was what capitalism and investing was about?

Anyway last time I post on Brexit here (possibly post at all) and I will keep my own council but continue to learn from others who post here and hopefully enhance my investing returns in the future (37% in 2016 and 61% this year to date with only 20 or so trades this year.)

PS. Having just read through the posts here and seen that my original post garnered 20 thumbs up which is heartening, (and yours at least a thumbs down or two) I feel slightly more at “home” posting here, so may well continue to do so and just skim over your posts.

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Fangorn 11th Nov Reported for Disruptive Behaviour
5

"I dont understand. Is my 11 year old son not allowed to play rugby and am I not allowed to watch him play? "

Not the point I'm making, as you well know - ..nice disingenuous diversion though - no surprise, you're a remoaner!

Most parents dont have the opportunity to watch their kids play Rugby so yours must be at a public school 0f some sort!

"My mistake of course, I should have stayed clear of the Brexit thing or DM’d Paul."

Yes you should because your defeatist remoanerdom is well known!

"Anyway he lost the match 6 - 3 if that makes you feel even better but not quite sure why it is a bubble I live in. I started my business in 1993 and at the time had £3.50 in the bank, over the initial 7 years I borrowed £20k from my late mother so that I could survive, in now turns over a couple of million and makes a tidy profit. Is there anything wrong with that? I thought that was what capitalism and investing was about?"

I really dont care tbh...I place more faith in likes of Martin/Wetherspoons, Jim Mellon et al than you, or those you place in such high regard who've been consistently wrong about everything.

"PS. Having just read through the posts here and seen that my original post garnered 20 thumbs up which is heartening, (and yours at least a thumbs down or two) I feel slightly more at “home” posting here, so may well continue to do so and just skim over your posts."

That'd be because stockopedia is the same bubble!

The same people here are most, likely Pro Remain

I'm so glad you place such faith in "thumbs up" postings - Brexit Reffy was 52% AYE, 48% nay
Any chance you can accept that and stop whining?

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Murakami 12th Nov 73 of 77
12

No more politics please, this is an investing focused site, any more overtly political posts will be moderated by the site admins and may lead to a site ban. Thanks, M

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markfletcher 15th Nov 74 of 77

In reply to Wimbledonsprinter, post #63

Hello WimbledonSprinter, I think your first para is effectively another way of saying what I was originally getting at - it's unwise for investors to place too much weight on what sdm says about its orderbank backlog.
I used to hold sdm and like you I was concerned about the exceptionals, debt, and cashflow. In 2015/6 a new factory was opened in Asia, and the UK sites and operations were streamlined. As a result I was expecting cashflow and margins to improve in 2017, even without revenue growth. However although SDM reduced debt in 2016, it rose again in H1 17 and the outlook was guarded so I sold at the interims.
I like sdm's strategy but I have lost confidence in the management. The Capital Markets presentation of 26th April was uninspiring in content and delivery.
My main reason for investing in sdm was the acquisition of United Wireless which I thought was potentially transformational for growth prospects. United was tiny but had a consistent growth CAGR of >25%. However sdm seems to have relocated the wireless business to Sweden and only a handful of staff remain on wireless in the UK. This reorganisation coincided with the loss of the large wireless customer which caused the previous sdm profit warning. At the time of the United acquisition the former owners were given significant sdm share holdings and roles, but they now appear to have been marginalised in favour of ex-Laird people who presumably have worked with Charlie Peppiatt in the past. So as far as I am concerned the integration of the United acquisition has not been handled well and that makes me question management and the future prospects for this division.
As you say if sdm can partially deliver on it's strategy then some sort of SP recovery should follow, but sdm seems accident prone and in my view further disappointments are likely. I don't think sdm will ever achieve consistent organic growth under this management team for the reasons outlined above and others.

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Effortless Cool 15th Nov 75 of 77

In reply to purpleski, post #71

purpleski,

I thoroughly endorse the sentiment of your post but would respectfully suggest that you might prefer to keep your own counsel, rather than "keep your own council", which sounds both expensive and dull (although with those investment returns, you can probably afford it).

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purpleski 15th Nov 76 of 77
1

In reply to Murakami, post #73

Hi Murakami

I largely agree with you but Paul raised the B word and it will impact on our investing universe but will try to avoid responding even if Paul mentions it!!:-)

Didn’t not realise you worked for Stockopedia. Will stay clear of B...t but it will impact stocks, so as long as it does not result in personal abuse, see some of the comments directed at me above, then I think it is a fair subject for comment, for example if one is discussing airline stocks or companies that trade heavily with Europe for example or relie on the free movement of goods heavily as reported by Mark Brumby over at Langton this morning (though Aston Martin is not a PLC)

“ Aston Martin says that it may have to halt production if a deal is not struck with the EU. CFO Mark Wilson says no-deal would have the ‘semi-catastrophic effect of having to stop production’”.

Best wishes

Michael

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purpleski 15th Nov 77 of 77

In reply to Effortless Cool, post #75

Oops sorry :-)

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About Paul Scott

Paul Scott

I trained as an accountant with a Top 5 firm, but that was so boring that I spent too much time in the 1990s being a disco bunny, and busting moves on the dancefloor, and chilling out with mates back at either my house or theirs, and having a lot of fun!Then spent 8 years as FD for a ladieswear retail chain called "Pilot", leaving on great terms in 2002 - having been a key player in growing the business 10 fold. If the truth be told, I partied pretty hard at the weekends too, so bank reconciliations on Monday mornings were more luck than judgement!! But they were always correct.I got bored with that and decided to become a professional small caps investor in 2002. I made millions, but got too cocky, and lost the lot in 2008, due to excessive gearing. A miserable, wilderness period occurred from 2008-2012.Since then, the sun has begun to shine again! I am now utterly briliant again, and immerse myself in small caps, and am a walking encyclopedia on the subject. I love writing a daily report for Stockopedia.com on most weekday mornings, constantly researching daily results & trading updates for small caps. Cheese! more »

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